PRODUCTION ENGINEERING 6, 7, 8 semesterSyllabus Anna University

ANNA UNIVERSITY CHENNAI :: CHENNAI 600 025
AFFILIATED INSTITUTIONS
REGULATIONS – 2008
B.E - PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
CURRICULUM AND SYLLABI
SEMESTER-VI
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
THEORY
PR 2351 Finite Element Analysis In Manufacturing 3 0 0 3
PR 2352 Computer Aided Product Design 3 1 0 4
PR 2353 Automated Production and Computer Integrated
Manufacturing
3 1 0 4
PR 2354 Design of Jigs, Fixtures and Press Tools 3 0 0 3
Elective – I 3 0 0 3
Elective – II 3 0 0 3
PRACTICALS
PR 2355 Metal Forming Lab and Special Machines Lab 0 0 4 2
PR 2356 Metrology and Inspection Lab 0 0 3 2
PR 2357 Welding and Foundry Lab 0 0 4 2
SEMESTER-VII
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
THEORY
GE 2022 Total Quality Management 3 0 0 3
ME 2401 Mechatronics 3 0 0 2
ME 2027 Process Planning and Cost Estimation 3 0 0 3
ME 2028 Robotics 3 0 0 3
Elective – III 3 0 0 3
Elective – IV 3 0 0 3
PRACTICALS
ME2404 Computer Aided Design & Simulation Lab 0 0 3 2
ME 2405 Mechatronics Lab 0 0 3 2
PR 2404 Design and Fabrication Lab 0 0 4 2
SEMESTER-VIII
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
THEORY
MG 2401 Engineering Economics & Cost Analysis 3 0 0 3
Elective – V 3 0 0 3
Elective – VI 3 0 0 3
PRACTICALS
PR 2451 Comprehension 0 0 3 2
PR 2452 Project Work 0 0 6 12
2
LIST OF ELECTIVES
VI SEMESTER
SL.NO. CODE
NO.
ELECTIVES L T P C
1. MG 2021 Marketing Management 3 0 0 3
2. ME 2021 Quality Control & Reliability Engineering 3 0 0 3
3. ME 2026 Unconventional Manufacturing Processes 3 0 0 3
4. PR2021 Precision Engineering 3 0 0 3
5. PR2022 Fuzzy Logic and ANN 3 0 0 3
6. PR2023 Instrumentation and Control 3 0 0 3
7. PR2024 Surface Engineering 3 0 0 3
VII SEMESTER
8. PR2025 Design of Machine Tool Structure 3 0 0 3
9. PR2026 Production Management 3 0 0 3
10. PR2027 Ergonomics 3 0 0 3
11. ME2030 Composite Materials 3 0 0 3
12. PR2028 Processing of Polymer and Composites 3 0 0 3
13. PR2029 Engg Economics and Financial Management 3 0 0 3
14. PR2030 Purchasing and Materials Management 3 0 0 3
15. ME2038 Operations Research 3 0 0 3
16. PR2031 Non Destructive Testing Methods 3 0 0 3
17. PR2032 Simulation of manufacturing system 3 0 0 3
VIII SEMESTER
18 PR2033 Reliability Engineering 3 0 0 3
19 PR2034 Machine Tool Control and Condition Monitoring 3 0 0 3
21 PR2035 Mini Project 3 0 6 3
20 PR2036 Machine Vision 3 0 0 3
21 PR2037 Advances in Operation Research 3 0 0 3
22 GE2021 Professional Ethics in Engineering 3 0 0 3
23 GE2023 Fundamentals of Nanoscience 3 0 0 3
24 ME 2035 Entrepreneurship Development 3 0 0 3
25 ME 2036 Production Planning & Control 3 0 0 3
26 ME 2037 Maintenance Engineering 3 0 0 3
3
PR 2351 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS IN L T P C
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES:
 To introduce the concept of FEM and to apply in the field of Manufacturing
Engineering
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
General field problems in engineering-Discrete and continuous models-Characteristicsthe
relevance and place of finite element method-variational calculus-Variational
formulation of boundary value problems-The method of weighted residuals-Rayleigh-Ritz
and Galerkin methods-Solution of large system of equations-Choleski Decomposition-
Gaussian elimination procedures.
UNIT II GENERAL PROCEDURE OF FET 9
Discretization of Domain selection of interpolation polynomials-Convergence
requirements-Formulation of element characteristics matrices and load vectors –
Assembly of element characteristics matrices-Solution of finite element equations-Post
processing of results.
UNIT III FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF ONE DIMENSIONAL
AND TWO DIMENSIONAL PROBLEMS 10
One dimensional finite element analysis-Linear bar element-Quadratic bar element-
Beam element-Frame elements-One dimensional heat transfer-Two dimensional finite
element analysis approximation of geometry and field variables-Three nodded triangular
element-Four nodded rectangular element-Six nodded triangular element-Natural
coordinates and coordinate transformation – Numerical integration-Incorporation of
boundary conditions
UNIT IV ISO-PARAMETRIC ELEMENTS 9
Iso-parametric elements-Dynamic analysis-Equations of motion using Lagrange’s
approach-Consistent and Lumped mass matrices-Formulation of FE equations for
vibration problems-Solutionof Eigen value problems-Transient vibration analysis-
Thermal transients.
UNIT V APPLICATION OF FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS 8
Finite element analysis of Machine elements - Axi-symmetric FEA of a pressure vessel-
Application of FEM in various metal forming processes – Solid formulation and flow
formulation – FEA simulation of Metal cutting, Solidification of castings and Weldments.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Chandraputla T.R., and Belegundu A.D., “Introduction of Finite Element in
Engineering”, Prentice Hall of India, 1997.
2. Reddy.J.N., “An Introduction to Finite Element Method” McGraw Hill, International
Student Edition, 1993.
REFERENCES:
1. Rao.S.S., “The Finite Element Method in Engineering”, Pergamon Press, 1993.
2. Segarland. L.J., “Applied Finite Element Analysis”, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
3. Seshu.P., “Text Book of Finite Element Analysis”, Prentice Hall of India, 2003
4. Rajasekaran.S., “Numerical Methods for Initial and Boundary Value Problems”,
Wheeler and Co., Pvt. Ltd., 1987
5. Lewis R.W., Morgan K., Thomas H.R. and Seetharamu K.N., The Finite Element
Method in Heat Transfer Analysis, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 1996.
4
PR2352 COMPUTER AIDED PRODUCT DESIGN L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To introduce the concepts and applications of CAD
 To introduce the various concepts and techniques used for Product design and to
develop product design skills.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN 8
Introduction to Engineering Design – Various phases of systematic design – sequential
engineering and concurrent engineering – Computer hardware & Peripherals – software
packages for design and drafting.
UNIT II COMPUTER GRAPHICS FUNDAMENTALS 8
Computer graphics – applications – principals of interactive computer graphics – 2D 3D
transformations – projections – curves – Bezier, B-Spline and NURBS – Concepts.
UNIT III GEOMETRIC MODELING 9
Geometric Modeling – types – Wire frame surface and solid modeling – Boundary
Representation, constructive solid geometry – Graphics standards – assembly modeling
– use of software packages
UNIT IV PRODUCT DESIGN CONCEPTS 12
Product modeling – types of product models; product development process tools – TRIZ
– Altshuller’s inventive principles – Modeling of product metrics – Design for reliability –
design for manufacturability – machining, casting, and metal forming – design for
assembly and disassembly - Design for environment; Bench marking – FMEA – QFD –
DOE – Taguchi method of DOE – Quality loss functions – Design for product life cycle.
UNIT V PRODUCT DATA MANAGEMENT 8
Product Data Management – concepts – Collaborative product design and commerce –
Information Acquisition – Sourcing factor – manufacturing planning factor –
Customization factor – Product life cycle management.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Kevin Otto, Kristin Wood, “Product Design”, Pearson Education, 2000.
2. Ibrahim Zeid, “CAD/CAM theory and Practice”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1991.
REFERENCES:
1. Biren Prasad, “Concurrent Engineering Fundamentals Vol.11”, Prentice Hall, 1997.
2. James G.Bralla, “Handbook of Product Design for Manufacturing”, McGraw Hill, 1994
3. David F.Rogers.J, Alan Adams, “Mathematical Elements for Computer Graphics”,
McGraw Hill, 1990
5
PR 2353 AUTOMATED PRODUCTION & COMPUTER L T P C
INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING 3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart the knowledge of computer technology in all of the operational and information
processing activities related to manufacturing.
OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the various automated manufacturing activities
 To study the application of computer Technology in the
 Manufacturing activities
 To know the smooth transition from conventional manufacturing to automated
production and computer integrated manufacturing
PRE-REQUISITES:
Students must have sound knowledge on various Manufacturing types, – system and
operations
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 8
Product design & CAD, CAM, CAD/CAM and CIM – CIM Hardware and software – three
step process for implementation CIM – production concepts and mathematical models
covering production rate, manufacturing lead time, capacity utilisation, availability & WIP
– Automation – Reason for Automation and Automation strategies – The future
automated factory.
UNITII AUTOMATED PRODUCTION SYSTEMS AND
MATERIAL HANDLING AND STORAGE SYSTEM 10
Basic elements of an automated system – Advanced automated functions – Levels of
Automation - Fundamentals of Automated Production Lines – Work part Transfer
Mechanisms – Storage Buffers – Control of the Production Line – Application to
Machining System.
Factors influencing material handling system – 10 principles of Material handling –
Material transport system – Industrial Trucks, Mono-rails and other rail-guided vehicles,
conveyors, cranes & Hoists – Automated guided vehicle system – Types. Guidance
technology, vehicle management, despatch rules and safety.
Storage systems – Performance, storage location strategies, conventional methods –
Automated Storage and Retrieval systems – carousel storage systems.
UNIT III GROUP TECHNOLOGY AND CELLULAR MANUFACTURING 9
Part families – visual – parts classification and coding – case studies in coding –
Production flow analysis – benefits of G.T. – Application of G.T.
Cellular Manufacturing – Composite part concept – Machine cell design – Key machine
concept - quantitative analysis in cellular manufacturing – Rank order clustering
technique – Arranging machines in G.T. Cell – Hollier method 1 and 2.
UNIT IV FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEM 9
What is an FMS? – Types of FMS – FMS components – Workstations, Material Handling
and storage system – FMS Layout type, computer control system, Human resource –
Flow chart showing various operations in FMS – Dead lock in FMS – FMS application
and benefits – FMS planning and implementation issues.
Quantitative analysis of FMS – various bottle neck model – Sizing the FMS – Illustrative
examples.
6
UNIT V AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY, COMPUTER PROCESS
CONTROL AND SHOP FLOOR CONTROL 9
Automated assembly – Fundamental – system configuration, part delivery at work
station – Design for automated assembly
Computer process control – continuous, discrete process, control requirement,
capabilities, Level of process control – Computer process control – Computer process
interface, computer process monitoring, Direct Digital control, Supervisory control –
Distributed control system and personal computer.
Short floor control – Three phases – Factory data collection – manual method –
Automated and semiautomated data collection (ADC) – Bar code technologies and other
ADC Technologies.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Mikell P.Groover, “Automation, Production Systems and Computer-integrated
Manufacturing”, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, 2003
2. Radhakrishnan.P, Subramanyan.S and Raju.V, “CAD/CAM/CIM”, New Age\
International Publishers, 2000
REFERENCES:
1. James A.Retrg and Henry W. Kraebher, “Computer Integrated Manufacturing”,
Pearson Education, Asia, 2001
2. Viswamathan.N and Narahari.Y,“Performance modelling of automated manufacturing
system”, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, 1994.
PR2354 DESIGN OF JIGS, FIXTURE, PRESS TOOLS & DRAWING L T P C
3 1 0 4
OBJECTIVE:
 To introduce the concepts of various types of jigs, fixtures and dies
 To design and draw jig / fixture/ die for a given component
UNIT I LOCATION AND CLAMPING DEVICES IN JIGS AND FIXUTRES 9+3
Principles of Jigs and Fixture – Design concepts – Different types of locating devices –
different types of clamps – Drill bushes – types – Elements of fixtures.
UNIT II DESIGN OF ELEMENTS OF JIGS AND FIXTURE 9+3
Design concepts of Template Jig, Plate Jig, Sandwich Jig, Vice Jaw Jig, Latch Jig,
Turnover jig, Box jig – Fixtures for Milling, Grinding, Turning, Welding, and Assembly –
Modular fixtures.
UNIT III PRESS WORKING OPERATION AND FORMING DIES 9+3
Blanking, Piercing, lancing, notching, bending design features of dies for drawing,
extrusion, wire drawing and forging.
UNIT IV ELEMENTS OF DIE 9+3
Design concepts of the following elements of progressive, compound and
Combination dies – Die block – Die shoe – Bolster plate – punch – punch plate – punch
holder – guide pins and guide bushes – strippers – knockouts – stops - pilots – selection
of standard die sets – strip layout and development.
7
UNIT V DESIGN AND DRAWING DIES, JIGS AND FIXTURES 9+3
Progressive die – compound die – Bending and drawing dies – Drill Jigs – Milling
fixtures, turning fixtures.
L : 45 , T : 15 ,TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Donaldson, B.H. Lecain, Goold V.V., Tool Design, TMH Edition, 1978.
2. Kempster M.H.A., Introduction to Jigs and Fixtures, ELBS Edition, 1976
REFERENCES:
1. Handbook of metal forming, Kurt Lunge, McGraw Hill, Pub.Co. 1985.
2. Paquin, Die Design Fundamentals, Industrial Press Inc, New York, 1979
3. ASTME, Fundamentals of Tool design, Prentice Hall 1974
PR2355 METAL FORMING LAB AND SPECIAL MACHINES LAB L T P C
0 0 4 2
AIM:
To understand the basic principles of Metal forming process and to impart practical
knowledge in special machines.
OBJECTIVES:
 To establish hands-on experience in sheet metal forming, bulge forming and Super
plastic forming.
 To get hands on experience in machining gear, V-block, dovetail, etc.
 To study tool wear, acceptance test for machine tool
METAL FORMING LAB:
1. Construction Flow Stress – Strain curve
2. Erichsen cupping Test
3. Determination of interface friction factor using ring compression test
4. Construction of FLD of sheet metal
5. Water hammer forming
6. Determination of Power consumption in sheet rolling process
7. Determination of strain rate sensitivity index of given specimen
8. Superplastic forming studies on Pb-Sn alloys
9. Deep drawing
10. Forward Extrusion process
11. Micro-forming
12. Simulation studies on metal forming
SPECIAL MACHINE LAB:
1. Gear Hobbing
a. Spur Gear
b. Helical Gear
2. Planning Machine
a. V-Block
b. Dove Tail
3. Centreless Cylindrical Grinding
4. Milling Machine
8
a. Spur Gear
5. Tool And Cutter Grinding
6. Tool Wear Studies
7. Acceptance Test Of Machine Tool As Per ISI Test Chart
8. EDM
9. Capstan And Turret Lathe
10. Measurement Of Cutting Force
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
(Requirement for a batch of 30 Students)
S. No. Description of Equipment Quantity
required
1. Universal Testing Machine 10T 1
2. Erichsen cupping Tester 1
3. Hydraulic Press 50T 1
4. Water hammer forming apparatus 1
5. Two high Rolling mill 1
6. Top open muffle furnace (Max 1200 oC) 1
7. Dies for deep drawing 1 set
8. Dies for Micro forming 1 set
9. Dies for super plastic forming 1 set
10. FEM package (ABAQUS, ANSYS…) Any one
11. Dies for Constructing FLD of sheet metals 1 set
PR2356 METROLOGY AND INSPECTION LAB L T P C
0 0 3 2
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Measurements of angle using Sine bar / bevel protractor
2. Measurement of External and internal Taper angle
3. Measurement of Bore Diameter
4. Calibration of Dial gauge
5. Measurement of Roundness
6. Measurements of Screw Thread Parameters using three-wire method
7. Measurements of Surface Roughness
8. Measurements using toolmaker Microscope
9. Measurements using Profile Projector
10. Measurements using Vision Measuring System
11. Measurements using CMM
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
9
(Requirement for a batch of 30 Students)
S.No. Description of Equipment Quantity
required
1. Vernier Calipers 0-150
Vernier Calipers 0-300
5 Nos.
2 Nos.
2. Micrometer 0-25
Micrometer 25-50
Micrometer 50-75
5 Nos.
2 Nos.
2 Nos.
3. Dial gauges L.C 10micrometer
Dial gauge L.C. 2micrometer, 1 m.m.range
3 Nos.
2 Nos.
4. Height gauge Analog
Height gauge Digital
1 No.
1 No.
5. Slip gauge set 2 sets
6. Sine Bar 100 mm
Sine Bar 200 mm
1 No.
1 No.
7. Toolmakers microscope
Profile Projector
1 No.
1 No.
8. Gear tooth verniers 2 Nos.
9. Flangemic 0-25
Flangemic 25-50
1 No.
1 No.
10. Floating carriage micrometer
Thread plug gauges m24 x 3
Thread plug gauges m20 x 2.5
1 No.
1 No.
1 No.
11. 3 wire set box 1 No.
12. Surface roughness measuring Instrument with
accessories
1 No.
13. Precision spheres different dias 1 set
14. Dial Guage Caliberator 1 No.
15. Precision level 1 No.
16. Digital Micrometer 1 No.
17. Digital Vernier 0-150 1 No.
18. Digital Ht. Guage 1 No.
19. Bevel Protractor 1 No.
20. CMN 1 System
21. Vision measuring system 1 System
22. Boredial gauge 16-35, 35-60 1 Box each
23. Depth Vernier 0-150 1 No.
24. Depth micrometer with 6 rods 1 No.
25. Internal micrometer with Extn sleeves 1 No.
26. Precision Rollers 8 2 Nos.
27. Surface plate 1 No.
28. Bench centre 1 No.
10
PR2357 WELDING AND FOUNDRY LABORATORY L T P C
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE:
To familiarize the students with test procedures followed in foundry and to practice
various types of welding processes.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
Welding
Study of different welding equipments and accessories: Gas, Electric Welding
Oxy-acetylene gas welding of Lap joint, Butt Joint and T Joint.
Electric are welding of Lap Joint, Butt Joint, and T Joint.
Welding of pipes in different positions.
Brazing practice – furnace brazing.
Brazing welding of cast iron.
Thermit welding of thick material like rod plates etc.
Foundry
Preparation of green moulding sand using a 5 kg muller and testing for
Compression, shear, tensile, transverse strengths, hardness
in green condition:
ii. in dry condition after drying in oven at 150  C for one and half hour.
Permeability testing.
Determining the clay content.
Sieve analysis of dry silica sand.
Determining the moisture content by various methods.
Melting any non-ferrous metal and making simple castings - Demonstration.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
LIST OF EQUIPMENTS
(for a batch of 30 students)
5 Kg Muller - 1No.
Sand rammer - 1 No
Weighing balance - 1 No.
Universal sand strength testing with all accessories - 1 Set.
Permeability tester - 1 No.
Quick moisture tester - 1 No.
Infra-red drier - 1 No.
Sieve shaker with Sieves - 1 Set.
Crucible furnace - 1 No.
Oxy acetylene gas welding equipment - 1 Set.
Electric Welding Transformer, welding booth - 5 No.
11
GE2022 TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
Introduction - Need for quality - Evolution of quality - Definition of quality - Dimensions of
manufacturing and service quality - Basic concepts of TQM - Definition of TQM – TQM
Framework - Contributions of Deming, Juran and Crosby – Barriers to TQM.
UNIT II TQM PRINCIPLES 9
Leadership – Strategic quality planning, Quality statements - Customer focus –
Customer orientation, Customer satisfaction, Customer complaints, Customer retention -
Employee involvement – Motivation, Empowerment, Team and Teamwork, Recognition
and Reward, Performance appraisal - Continuous process improvement – PDSA cycle,
5s, Kaizen - Supplier partnership – Partnering, Supplier selection, Supplier Rating.
UNIT III TQM TOOLS & TECHNIQUES I 9
The seven traditional tools of quality – New management tools – Six-sigma: Concepts,
methodology, applications to manufacturing, service sector including IT – Bench marking
– Reason to bench mark, Bench marking process – FMEA – Stages, Types.
UNIT IV TQM TOOLS & TECHNIQUES II 9
Quality circles – Quality Function Deployment (QFD) – Taguchi quality loss function –
TPM – Concepts, improvement needs – Cost of Quality – Performance measures.
UNIT V QUALITY SYSTEMS 9
Need for ISO 9000- ISO 9000-2000 Quality System – Elements, Documentation, Quality
auditing- QS 9000 – ISO 14000 – Concepts, Requirements and Benefits – Case studies
of TQM implementation in manufacturing and service sectors including IT.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Dale H.Besterfiled, et at., “Total Quality Management”, Pearson Education Asia,
Third Edition, Indian Reprint (2006).
2. Suganthi,L and Anand Samuel, “Total Quality Management”, Prentice Hall (India)
Pvt. Ltd.,2006.
REFERENCES:
1. James R. Evans and William M. Lindsay, “The Management and Control of Quality”,
6th Edition, South-Western (Thomson Learning), 2005.
2. Oakland, J.S. “TQM – Text with Cases”, Butterworth – Heinemann Ltd., Oxford, 3rd
Edition, 2003.
3. Janakiraman,B and Gopal, R.K, “Total Quality Management – Text and Cases”,
Prentice Hall (India) Pvt. L
ME2401 MECHATRONICS L T P C
(Common to Mechanical and Production) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
To understand the interdisciplinary applications of Electronics, Electrical, Mechanical
and Computer Systems for the Control of Mechanical and Electronic Systems.
UNIT I MECHATRONICS, SENSORS AND TRANSDUCERS 9
Introduction to Mechatronics Systems – Measurement Systems – Control Systems –
Microprocessor based Controllers. Sensors and Transducers – Performance
Terminology – Sensors for Displacement, Position and Proximity; Velocity, Motion,
Force, Fluid Pressure, Liquid Flow, Liquid Level, Temperature,Light Sensors – Selection
of Sensors.
12
UNIT II ACTUATION SYSTEMS 9
Pneumatic and Hydraulic Systems – Directional Control Valves – Rotary Actuators.
Mechanical Actuation Systems – Cams – Gear Trains – Ratchet and pawl – Belt and
Chain Drives – Bearings. Electrical Actuation Systems – Mechanical Switches – Solid
State Switches – Solenoids – Construction and working principle of DC and AC Motors
– speed control of AC and DC drives, Stepper Motors-switching circuitries for stepper
motor – AC & DC Servo motors
UNITIII SYSTEM MODELS AND CONTROLLERS 9
Building blocks of Mechanical, Electrical, Fluid and Thermal Systems, Rotational –
Transnational Systems, Electromechanical Systems – Hydraulic – Mechanical Systems.
Continuous and discrete process Controllers – Control Mode – Two – Step mode –
Proportional Mode – Derivative Mode – Integral Mode – PID Controllers – Digital
Controllers – Velocity Control – Adaptive Control – Digital Logic Control – Micro
Processors Control.
UNIT IV PROGRAMMING LOGIC CONTROLLERS 9
Programmable Logic Controllers – Basic Structure – Input / Output Processing –
Programming – Mnemonics – Timers, Internal relays and counters – Shift Registers –
Master and Jump Controls – Data Handling – Analogs Input / Output – Selection of a
PLC.
UNIT V DESIGN OF MECHATRONICS SYSTEM 9
Stages in designing Mechatronics Systems – Traditional and Mechatronic Design -
Possible Design Solutions. Case studies of Mechatronics systems- Pick and place
Robot- Autonomous mobile robot-Wireless suriviellance balloon- Engine Management
system- Automatic car park barrier.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Bolton,W, “Mechatronics” , Pearson education, second edition, fifth Indian Reprint,
2003
2. Smaili.A and Mrad.F , "Mechatronics integrated technologies for intelligent
machines", Oxford university press, 2008
REFERENCES:
1. Rajput. R.K, A textbook of mechatronics, S. Chand & Co, 2007
2. Michael B. Histand and David G. Alciatore, “ Introduction to Mechatronics and
Measurement Systems”, McGraw-Hill International Editions, 2000.
3. Bradley D. A., Dawson D., Buru N.C. and. Loader A.J, “Mechatronics”, Chapman and
Hall, 1993.
4. Dan Necsulesu, “Mechatronics”, Pearson Education Asia, 2002 (Indian Reprint).
5. Lawrence J. Kamm, “Understanding Electro – Mechanical Engineering”, An
Introduction to Mechatronics, Prentice – Hall of India Pvt., Ltd., 2000.
6. Nitaigour Premchand Mahadik, “Mechatronics”, Tata McGraw-Hill publishing
Company Ltd, 2003
13
ME 2027 PROCESS PLANNING AND COST ESTIMATION L T P C
(Common to Production and Mechanical) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
To introduce the process planning concepts
To make cost estimation for various products after process planning
UNIT I WORK STUDY AND ERGONOMICS 10
Method study – Definition – Objectives-Motion economy- Principles – Tools and
Techniques-Applications – Work measurements- purpose – use – procedure – tools and
techniques- Standard time –Ergonomics – principles – applications.
UNIT II PROCESS PLANNING 10
Definition – Objective – Scope – approaches to process planning- Process planning
activities – Finished part requirements - operating sequences - machine selection –
material selection parameters- Set of documents for process planning - Developing
manufacturing logic and knowledge- production time calculation – selection of cost
optimal processes.
UNIT III INTRODUCTION TO COST ESTIMATION 7
Objective of cost estimation- costing – cost accounting- classification of cost- Elements
of cost.
UNIT IV COST ESTIMATION 8
Types of estimates – methods of estimates – data requirements and sources- collection
of cost- allowances in estimation.
UNIT V PRODUCTION COST ESTIMATION 10
Estimation of material cost, labour cost and over heads, allocation of overheads –
Estimation for different types of jobs.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Banga and Sharma , Cost estimation , Sinha.B.P., “Mechanical Estimating and
Costing”, Tata McGraw-Hill, Publishing Co., 1995.
REFERENCES:
1. Phillip.F Ostwalal and Jairo Munez, “Manufacturing Processes and systems”, John
Wiley, 9th Edition, 1998
2. Russell.R.S and Tailor, B.W, “Operations Management”, PHI, 4th Edition, 2003.
3. Chitale.A.V. and Gupta.R.C., “Product Design and Manufacturing”, PHI , 2nd Edition,
2002.
ME2028 ROBOTICS L T P C
(Common to Production and VII Semester Elective for Mechanical) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES
 To introduce the basic concepts, parts of robots and types of robots
 To make the student familiar with the various drive systems for robot, sensors
and their applications in robots, programming of robots
 To discuss about the various applications of robots, justification, implementation
and safety of robot.
14
UNIT I FUNDAMENTALS OF ROBOT 7
Robot – Definition – Robot Anatomy – Co-ordinate Systems, Work Envelope, types and
classification – Specifications – Pitch, Yaw, Roll, Joint Notations, Speed of Motion, Pay
Load – Robot Parts and Their Functions – Need for Robots – Different Applications
UNIT II ROBOT DRIVE SYSTEMS AND END EFFECTORS 10
Pneumatic Drives – Hydraulic Drives – Mechanical Drives – Electrical Drives – D.C.
Servo Motors, Stepper Motor, A.C. Servo Motors – Salient Features, Applications and
Comparison of All these Drives
End Effectors – Grippers – Mechanical Grippers, Pneumatic and Hydraulic Grippers,
Magnetic Grippers, Vacuum Grippers; Two Fingered and Three Fingered Grippers;
Internal Grippers and External Grippers; Selection and Design Considerations
UNIT III SENSORS AND MACHINE VISION 10
Requirements of a sensor, Principles and Applications of the following types of sensors
– Position of sensors (Piezo Electric Sensor, LVDT, Resolvers, Optical Encoders,
Pneumatic Position Sensors), Range Sensors (Triangulation Principle, Structured,
Lighting Approach, Time of Flight Range Finders, Laser Range Meters), Proximity
Sensors (Inductive, Hall Effect, Capacitive, Ultrasonic and Optical Proximity Sensors),
Touch Sensors, (Binary Sensors, Analog Sensors), Wrist Sensors, Compliance Sensors,
Slip Sensors
Camera, Frame Grabber, Sensing and Digitizing Image Data – Signal Conversion,
Image Storage, Lighting Techniques. Image Processing and Analysis – Data Reduction,
Segmentation, Feature Extraction, Object Recognition, Other Algorithms. Applications –
Inspection, Identification, Visual Serving and Navigation.
UNIT IV ROBOT KINEMATICS AND ROBOT PROGRAMMING 10
Forward Kinematics, Inverse Kinematics and Differences; Forward Kinematics and
Reverse Kinematics of Manipulators with Two, Three Degrees of Freedom (In 2
Dimensional), Four Degrees of Freedom (In 3 Dimensional) – Deviations and Problems
Teach Pendant Programming, Lead through programming, Robot programming
Languages – VAL Programming – Motion Commands, Sensor Commands, End effecter
commands, and Simple programs.
UNIT V IMPLEMENTATION AND ROBOT ECONOMICS 8
RGV, AGV; Implementation of Robots in Industries – Various Steps; Safety
Considerations for Robot Operations; Economic Analysis of Robots – Pay back Method,
EUAC Method, Rate of Return Method.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. M.P.Groover, “Industrial Robotics – Technology, Programming and Applications”,
McGraw-Hill, 2001
2. Yoram Koren, “Robotics for Engineers”, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1992.
REFERENCES:
1. Fu.K.S. Gonzalz.R.C., and Lee C.S.G., “Robotics Control, Sensing, Vision and
Intelligence”, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1987.
2. Janakiraman.P.A., “Robotics and Image Processing”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 1995.
15
ME2404 COMPUTER AIDED SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS LAB L T P C
0 0 3 2
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
A. Simulation 8
Simulation of Air conditioning system with condenser temperature and evaporator
temperatures as input to get COP using C /MAT Lab.
Simulation of Hydraulic / Pneumatic cylinder using C / MAT Lab.
Simulation of cam and follower mechanism using C / MAT Lab.
B. Analysis (Simple Treatment only) 37
Stress analysis of a plate with a circular hole.
Stress analysis of rectangular L bracket
Stress analysis of an axi-symmetric component
Stress analysis of beams (Cantilever, Simply supported, Fixed ends)
Mode frequency analysis of a 2 D component
Mode frequency analysis of beams (Cantilever, Simply supported, Fixed ends)
Harmonic analysis of a 2D component
Thermal stress analysis of a 2D component
Conductive heat transfer analysis of a 2D component
Convective heat transfer analysis of a 2D component
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
LIST OF Equipments
(for a batch of 30 students)
Computer System 30
17” VGA Color Monitor
Pentium IV Processor
40 GB HDD
512 MB RAM
Color Desk Jet Printer 01
Software
Suitable analysis software 30 licenses
C / MATLAB 5 licenses
ME2405 MECHATRONICS LAB L T P C
(Common to Mechanical and Production) 0 0 3 2
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Design and testing of fluid power circuits to control
(i) Velocity (ii) direction and (iii) force of single and double acting actuators
2. Design of circuits with logic sequence using Electro pneumatic trainer kits.
3. Simulation of basic Hydraulic, Pneumatic and Electric circuits using software
4. Circuits with multiple cylinder sequences in Electro pneumatic using PLC
5. Speed Control of AC & DC drives
6. Servo controller interfacing for DC motor
7. PID controller interfacing
16
8. Stepper motor interfacing with 8051 Micro controller
(i) full step resolution (ii) half step resolution
9. Modeling and analysis of basic electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems using
appropriate softwares
10. Computerized data logging system with control for process variables like pressure
flow and temperature.
TOTAL : 45 PERIODS
LIST OF EQUIPMENT
(for a batch of 30 students)
1. Basic Pneumatic Trainer Kit with manual and electrical controls/
PLC Control -1 each
2. Basic Hydraulic Trainer Kit - 1 No.
3. Hydraulics and Pneumatics Systems Simulation Softwares - 10 sets.
4. 8051 - Microcontroller kit with stepper motor and drive circuit - 2 sets
5. Simulation Softwares and Sensors to measure Pressure,
Flow rate, direction, speed, velocity and force. -2 sets
PR2404 DESIGN AND FABRICATION LAB L T P C
0 0 4 2
The objective of this project is to provide opportunity for the students to implement their
skills acquired in the previous semesters to practical problems.
The students in convenient groups of not more than 4 members have to take one small
item for design and fabrication. Every project work shall have a guide who is the member
of the faculty of the institution and if possible with an industry guide also.
The item chosen may be small machine elements (Example-screw jack, coupling,
machine vice, cam and follower, governor etc), attachment to machine tools, tooling
(jigs, fixtures etc), small gear box, automotive appliances, agricultural implements,
simple heat exchangers, small pumps, hydraulic /pneumatic devices etc.
The students are required to design and fabricate the chosen item in the college and
demonstrate its working apart from submitting the project report. The report should
contain assembly drawing, parts drawings, process charts relating to fabrication.
TOTAL: 60 PERIODS
MG2451 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS AND COST ANALYSIS L T P C
(Common to Mechanical, Production, Automobile) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES
To learn about the basics of economics and cost analysis related to engineering so as to
take economically sound decisions.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 8
Introduction to Economics- Flow in an economy, Law of supply and demand, Concept of
Engineering Economics – Engineering efficiency, Economic efficiency, Scope of
engineering economics- Element of costs, Marginal cost, Marginal Revenue, Sunk cost,
Opportunity cost, Break-even analysis- V ratio, Elementary economic Analysis – Material
selection for product Design selection for a product, Process planning.
17
UNIT II VALUE ENGINEERING 10
Make or buy decision, Value engineering – Function, aims, Value engineering
procedure. Interest formulae and their applications –Time value of money, Single
payment compound amount factor, Single payment present worth factor, Equal payment
series sinking fund factor, Equal payment series payment Present worth factor- equal
payment series capital recovery factor-Uniform gradient series annual equivalent factor,
Effective interest rate, Examples in all the methods.
UNIT III CASH FLOW 9
Methods of comparison of alternatives – present worth method (Revenue dominated
cash flow diagram), Future worth method (Revenue dominated cash flow diagram, cost
dominated cash flow diagram), Annual equivalent method (Revenue dominated cash
flow diagram, cost dominated cash flow diagram), rate of return method, Examples in all
the methods.
UNIT IV REPLACEMENT AND MAINTENANCE ANALYSIS 9
Replacement and Maintenance analysis – Types of maintenance, types of replacement
problem, determination of economic life of an asset, Replacement of an asset with a new
asset – capital recovery with return and concept of challenger and defender, Simple
probabilistic model for items which fail completely.
UNIT V DEPRECIATION 9
Depreciation- Introduction, Straight line method of depreciation, declining balance
method of depreciation-Sum of the years digits method of depreciation, sinking fund
method of depreciation/ Annuity method of depreciation, service output method of
depreciation-Evaluation of public alternatives- introduction, Examples, Inflation adjusted
decisions – procedure to adjust inflation, Examples on comparison of alternatives and
determination of economic life of asset.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Panneer Selvam, R, “Engineering Economics”, Prentice Hall of India Ltd, New Delhi,
2001.
2. Suma Damodaran, “ Managerial economics”, Oxford university press 2006.
REFERENCES:
1. References Chan S.Park, “Contemporary Engineering Economics”, Prentice Hall of
India, 2002.
2. Donald.G. Newman, Jerome.P.Lavelle, “Engineering Economics and analysis” Engg.
Press, Texas, 2002
3. Degarmo, E.P., Sullivan, W.G and Canada, J.R, “Engineering Economy”, Macmillan,
New York, 1984
4. Grant.E.L., Ireson.W.G., and Leavenworth, R.S, “Principles of Engineering
Economy”, Ronald Press, New York,1976.
5. Smith, G.W., “Engineering Economy”, Lowa State Press, Iowa, 1973.
6. Truett & Truett, “ Managerial economics- Analysis, problems & cases “ Wiley India 8th
edition 2004.
7. Luke M Froeb / Brian T Mccann, “ Managerail Economics – A problem solving
approach” Thomson learning 2007.
18
PR2451 COMPREHENSION L T P C
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVE:
The objective of comprehension is to provide opportunity for the student to apply the
knowledge acquired during the earlier semesters to real life problems which he / she
may have to face in future as an engineer. While learning as how to solve the real life
problems, student will receive guidance from the faculty and also review various courses
learnt earlier.
Further this comprehension is to achieve an understanding of the fundamentals of
contemporary manufacturing systems including materials, manufacturing process,
product and process control, computer integrated manufacture and quality. The
students work in groups and solve a variety of problems given to them. The problems
given to the students should be of real like industrial problems selected by a group of
faculty members of the concerned department. A minimum of three small problems has
to be solved by each group of students. The evaluation is based on continuous
assessment by a group of Faculty Members constituted by the professor in-charge of the
course.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
PR2452 PROJECT WORK L T P C
0 0 6 12
OBJECTIVE:
The objective of the project work is to enable the students in convenient groups of not
more than 4 members on a project involving theoretical and experimental studies related
to the branch of study. Every project work shall have a guide who is the member of the
faculty of the institution. Six periods per week shall be allotted in the time table and this
time shall be utilized by the students to receive the directions from the guide, on library
reading, laboratory work, computer analysis or field work as assigned by the guide and
also to present in periodical seminars on the progress made in the project.
The aim of the project work is to deepen comprehension of principles by applying them
to a new problem which may be the design and manufacture of a device, a research
investigation, a computer or management project or a design problem.
The progress of the project is evaluated based on a minimum of three reviews. The
review committee may be constituted by the Head of the Department.
Each student shall finally produce a comprehensive report covering background
information, literature survey, problem statement, project work details and conclusion.
This final report shall be typewritten form as specified in the guidelines.
The continuous assessment shall be made as prescribed in the regulations (vide clause
10.3 of Regulations 2004 for B.E., B.Tech. programmes)
TOTAL: 90 PERIODS
19
MG 2021 MARKETING MANAGEMENT L T P C
(COMMON TO MECHANICAL, PRODUCTION AND MECHATRONICS) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To understand the various processes involved in Marketing and its Philosophy.
 To learn the Psychology of consumers.
 To formulate strategies for advertising, pricing and selling
UNIT I MARKETING PROCESS 9
Definition, Marketing process, dynamics, needs, wants and demands, marketing
concepts, environment, mix, types. Philosophies, selling versus marketing,
organizations, industrial versus consumer marketing, consumer goods, industrial goods,
product hierarchy
UNIT II BUYING BEHAVIOUR AND MARKET SEGMENTATION 9
Cultural, demographic factors, motives, types, buying decisions, segmentation factors -
demographic -Psycho graphic and geographic segmentation, process, patterns.
UNIT III PRODUCT PRICING AND MARKETING RESEARCH 9
Objectives, pricing, decisions and pricing methods, pricing management. Introduction,
uses, process of marketing research.
UNIT IV MARKETING PLANNING AND STRATEGY FORMULATION 9
Components of marketing plan-strategy formulations and the marketing process,
implementations, portfolio analysis, BCG, GEC grids.
UNIT V ADVERTISING, SALES PROMOTION AND DISTRIBUTION 9
Characteristics, impact, goals, types, and sales promotions- point of purchase- unique
selling proposition. Characteristics, wholesaling, retailing, channel design, logistics, and
modern trends in retailing.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Govindarajan. M, “Marketing management – concepts, cases, challenges and
trends”, Prentice hall of India, second edition 2007.
2. Philip Kolter,Koshy Jha “Marketing Management”, Pearson Education ,Indian
adapted edition.2007
REFERENCES:
1. Ramasamy and Nama kumari, “Marketing Environment: Planning, implementation
and control the Indian context”, 1990.
2. Czinkota&Kotabe, “Marketing management”, Thomson learning, Indian edition 2007
3. Adrain palmer, “ Introduction to marketing theory and practice”, Oxford university
press IE 2004.
4. Donald S. Tull and Hawkins, “Marketing Reasearch”, Prentice Hall of Inida-1997.
5. Philip Kotler and Gary Armstrong “Principles of Marketing” Prentice Hall of India,
2000.
6. Steven J.Skinner, “Marketing”, All India Publishers and Distributes Ltd. 1998.
7. Graeme Drummond and John Ensor, Introduction to marketing concepts, Elsevier,
Indian Reprint, 2007
20
ME2021 QUALITY CONTROL AND RELIABILITY ENGINEERING L T P C
(Common To Mechanical, Automobile And Production- VI Semester Core) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To introduce the concept of SQC
 To understand process control and acceptance sampling procedure and their
application.
 To learn the concept of reliability.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION AND PROCESS CONTROL FOR VARIABLES 10
Introduction, definition of quality, basic concept of quality, definition of SQC, benefits and
limitation of SQC, Quality assurance,Quality control: Quality cost-Variation in processcausesof
variation –Theory of control chart- uses of control chart – Control chart for
variables – X chart, R chart and  chart -process capability – process capability studies
and simple problems.Six sigma concepts.
UNIT II PROCESS CONTROL FOR ATTRIBUTES 8
Control chart for attributes –control chart for non conformings– p chart and np chart –
control chart for nonconformities– C and U charts, State of control and process out of
control identification in charts, pattern study.
UNIT III ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING 9
Lot by lot sampling – types – probability of acceptance in single, double, multiple
sampling techniques – O.C. curves – producer’s Risk and consumer’s Risk. AQL, LTPD,
AOQL concepts-standard sampling plans for AQL and LTPD- uses of standard sampling
plans.
UNIT IV LIFE TESTING - RELIABILITY 9
Life testing – Objective – failure data analysis, Mean failure rate, mean time to failure,
mean time between failure, hazard rate – Weibull model, system reliability, series,
parallel and mixed configuration – simple problems. Maintainability and availability –
simple problems. Acceptance sampling based on reliability test – O.C Curves.
UNIT V QUALITY AND RELIABLITY 9
Reliability improvements – techniques- use of Pareto analysis – design for reliability –
redundancy unit and standby redundancy – Optimization in reliability – Product design –
Product analysis – Product development – Product life cycles.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
Note: Use of approved statistical table permitted in the examination.
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Douglas.C.Montgomery, “ Introduction to Statistical quality control” John wiley 4th
edition2001.
2. L.S.Srinath, “Reliability Engineering”, Affiliated East west press, 1991.
REFERENCES:
1. John.S. Oakland. Statistical process control”, Elsevier, 5th edition, 2005
2. Connor, P.D.T.O., “ Practical Reliability Engineering”, John Wiley, 1993
3. Grant, Eugene .L “Statistical Quality Control”, McGraw-Hill, 1996
4. Monohar Mahajan, “Statistical Quality Control”, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, 2001.
5. R.C.Gupta, “Statistical Quality control”, Khanna Publishers, 1997.
6. Besterfield D.H., “Quality Control”, Prentice Hall, 1993.
7. Sharma S.C., “Inspection Quality Control and Reliability”, Khanna Publishers, 1998.
8. Danny Samson, “Manufacturing & Operations Strategy”, Prentice Hall, 1991
21
ME2026 UNCONVENTIONAL MACHINING PROCESSES L T P C
(Common To Mechanical And Production) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To learn about various unconventional machining processes, the various process
parameters and their influence on performance and their applications
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 5
Unconventional machining Process – Need – classification – Brief overview .
UNIT II MECHANICAL ENERGY BASED PROCESSES 10
Abrasive Jet Machining – Water Jet Machining – Abrasive Water Jet Machining
Ultrasonic Machining. (AJM, WJM, AWJM and USM). Working Principles – equipment
used – Process parameters – MRR-Variation in techniques used – Applications.
UNIT III ELECTRICAL ENERGY BASED PROCESSES 8
Electric Discharge Machining (EDM)- working Principle-equipments-Process
Parameters-Surface Finish and MRR- electrode / Tool – Power and control Circuits-Tool
Wear – Dielectric – Flushing – Wire cut EDM – Applications.
UNIT IV CHEMICAL AND ELECTRO-CHEMICAL ENERGY BASED
PROCESSES 12
Chemical machining and Electro-Chemical machining (CHM and ECM)-Etchantsmaskant-
techniques of applying maskants-Process Parameters – Surface finish and
MRR-Applications. Principles of ECM-equipments-Surface Roughness and MRRElectrical
circuit-Process Parameters-ECG and ECH - Applications.
UNIT V THERMAL ENERGY BASED PROCESSES 10
Laser Beam machining and drilling (LBM), plasma Arc machining (PAM) and Electron
Beam Machining (EBM). Principles – Equipment –Types - Beam control techniques –
Applications.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Vijay.K. Jain “Advanced Machining Processes” Allied Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New
Delhi, 2007
2. Pandey P.C. and Shan H.S. “Modern Machining Processes” Tata McGraw-Hill, New
Delhi (2007).
REFERENCES:
1. Benedict. G.F. “Nontraditional Manufacturing Processes” Marcel Dekker Inc., New
York (1987).
2. Mc Geough, “Advanced Methods of Machining” Chapman and Hall, London (1998).
3. Paul De Garmo, J.T.Black, and Ronald.A.Kohser, “Material and Processes in
Manufacturing” Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi ,8th Edition,2001.
22
PR2021 PRECISION ENGINEERING L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES:
 To impart knowledge in the increasing quality concepts of parts, accuracy
requirement of machine tools and also to introduce latest topics in Manufacturing
like micro machining and smart materials so as to equip them to join core
electronic manufacturing industries.
UNIT I CONCEPTS OF ACCURACY AND MACHINE TOOLS 9
Part Accuracy – errors, accuracy of machine tools – spindle accuracy – displacement
accuracy – errors due to numerical interpolation – definition of accuracy of N.C system –
errors in the NC machines – feed stiffness – zero stability.
UNIT II STIFFNESS, THERMAL EFFECTS AND FINISH MACHINING 12
Overall stiffness of Lathe – compliance of work piece – errors caused by cutting forces –
deformation in turning – boring – milling – heat sources – thermal effects – Finish
Turning, boring, grinding – Surface roughness.
UNIT III DIMENSIONING 6
Definition of terms – Key dimension – Superfluous dimension – dimensional stepped
shaft – assigning tolerances in the constituent dimensions – dimensional chains.
UNIT IV MICRO-MACHINING MICRO FABRICATION 9
Micro Machining – Photo resist process – Lithography – LIGA Process – Optical,
processing of materials – electron beam machining – beam machining – micro forming,
diamond turning – micro positioning devices – etching – physical vapour deposition –
Chemical vapour deposition
UNIT V SMART STRUCTURES, MATERIALS AND MICRO ACTUATORS 9
Smart structures – Smart materials types and applications - smart sensors – micro
valves – MEMS – Micro motors – Micro pumps – micro dynamometer – micro machines
– micro optics – micro nozzles.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEST BOOKS:
1. Murthy R.L. “Precision Engineering in Manufacturing”, New Age Internaional Pvt.
Limited. (19
2. Juliar W.Gardner. Vijay K. Varadan, ‘Micro sensors, MEMS and Smart Devices, John
wiley and sons, 2001.
REFERENCES:
1. Stephen A.Campbell, “The Science and Engineering of Micro electronic Fabrication”,
Oxford University Press, 1996.
2. Raady Frank, “Understanding smart sensors”, Artech. House, Boston, 1996.
3. MEMS Hand Book, CRC Press, 2001
23
PR2022 FUZZY LOGIC AND ANN L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I INTRODUCTION TO FUZZY LOGIC PRINCIPLES 9
Basic concepts of fuzzy set theory – operations of fuzzy sets – properties of fuzzy sets –
Crisp relations – Fuzzy relational equations – operations on fuzzy relations – fuzzy
systems – propositional logic – Inference – Predicate Logic – Inference in predicate logic
– fuzzy logic principles – fuzzy quantifiers – fuzzy inference – fuzzy rule based systems
– fuzzification and defuzzification – types.
UNIT II ADVANCED FUZZY LOGIC APPLICATIONS 9
Fuzzy logic controllers – principles – review of control systems theory – various
industrial applications of FLC adaptive fuzzy systems – fuzzy decision making –
Multiobjective decision making – fuzzy classification – means clustering – fuzzy
pattern recognition – image processing applications – systactic recognition –
fuzzy optimization – various
UNIT III INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS 9
Fundamentals of neural networks – model of an artificial neuron – neural network
architectures – Learning methods – Taxonomy of Neural network architectures –
Standard back propagation algorithms – selection of various parameters – variations
Applications of back propagation algorithms.
UNIT IV OTHER ANN ARCHITECTURES 9
Associative memory – exponential BAM – Associative memory for real coded pattern
pairs – Applications adaptive reasonance theory – introduction – ART 1 – ART2 –
Applications – neural networks based on competition – kohenen self organizing maps –
learning vector quantization – counter propagation networks – industrial applications.
UNIT V RECENT ADVANCES 9
Fundamentals of genetic algorithms – genetic modeling – hybrid systems – integration of
fuzzy logic, neural networks and genetic algorithms – non traditional optimization
techniques like ant colony optimization – Particle swarm optimization and artificial
immune systems – applications in design and manufacturing.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. S.Rajasekaran.G.A.Vijayalakshmi Pai “Neural Networks, fuzzy logic and genetic
algorithms”, prentice hall of India private limited, 2003
2. Timothy J.Ross, “Fuzzy logic with engineering applications”, McGraw Hill, 1995
3. Zurada J.M. “Introduction to artificial neural systems”, Jaico publishing house, 1994
REFERENCES:
1. Klir.G, Yuan B.B. “Fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic prentice Hall of India private limited,
1997.
2. Laurance Fausett, “Fundamentals of neural networks”, Prentice hall, 1992
3. Gen, M. and R. Cheng “Genetic algorithm and engineering design”, john wiley 1997
24
PR2023 INSTRUMENTAITON AND CONTROL L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
Static and dynamic characteristics of measurement systems, standards and calibration,
error and uncertainty analysis, statistical analysis of data, and curve fitting.
UNIT II MECHANICAL MEASUREMENTS AND INDUSTRIAL
INSTRUMENTATION 10
Measurement of displacement, velocity (linear and rotational), acceleration, shock,
vibration, force torque power, strain, stress, pressure temperature.
UNIT III DATA DISPLAY AND RECORDING DEVICES 8
Data display-CRO,LED, LCD, magnetic tape recorders, x-y recorders, UV recorders,
Oscilloscope recorders, digital printers and data loggers.
UNIT IV CONTROL 9
Introduction to control systems, mathematical model of physical systems in transfer
function and state space forms, response of dynamic systems, concept of pole and zero
of a system, realization of transfer functions.
UNIT V STABILITY ANALYSIS 9
Stability criteria bode plots, routh and Nyquist criteria.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. B.C.Nakra, K.K.choudry, “Instrumentation, Measurement and analysis”, Tata
McGraw Hill 2002
2. J.J.Nagrath and Gopal, “control system engineering”, New age international (p) ltd.,
2000
REFERENCES:
1. C.S.Rangan, G.R.Sarma, VSV Mani, Instrumentation devices and systems”, Tata
McGraw Hill, 2000
2. A.K. Sowhney, “electricaland electronic measurement and instrumentation, “Dhanpat
rai & Cu, 2003.
3. Benjamin C.Kuo, “Automatic control system”, prentice hall of India pvt ltd.,2002
4. Ernest O.Doeblin, “measurement systems applications and design”, McGraw Hill
International editions, 1990
5. S.Renganathan, “transducer engineering”, Allied publishers, 1990.
PR2024 SURFACE ENGINEERING L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I METAL CLEANING AND PREVIEW ON SURFACE ENGINEERING 8
Need and relevance of surface engineering – pre-treatment of coating, General cleaning
process for ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys – selection of cleaning process –
alkaline cleaning – emulsion cleaning- ultrasonic cleaning – acid and pickling salt bath
descaling – abrasive bath cleaning – polishing and short peening – classification of
surface engineering processes.
25
UNIT II THERMAL SPRAYING PROCESSES AND ELECTRODEPOSITED
COATINGS 10
Thermal spraying – flame, arc, plasma and HVOF processes – PLV process – design for
thermally sprayed coatings – coating production – spray consumables principles of
electroplating – Technology and control electroplating systems – properties and
Faraday’s Law – factors affecting throwing power – Applications of electrodeposites –
non-aqueous and electroless deposition.
UNIT III HOT DIP COATING AND DIFFUSION COATINGS 10
Principles – surface preparation batch coating and continuous coating process – coating
properties and applications, Principles of cementation – cladding – Diffusion coating of
C.N. Al, Si, Cr and B – structure, properties and application of diffusion coatings –
chemical vapour deposition – physical vapour deposition.
UNIT IV NON-METALLIC COATING OXIDE AND COVENSION COATINGS 9
Plating coating – laequers – rubbers and elastomers – vitreous enamels – anodizing
phosphating and chromating – application to aluminium, magnesium, tin, zinc, cadmium
copper and silver – phosphating primers.
UNIT V QUALITY ASSURANCE, TESTING AND
SELECTION OF COATINGS 8
The quality plan – design – testing and inspection of thickness adhesion, corrosion,
resistance and porosity measurement – selection of coatings – industrial applications of
engineering coatings. Basic mechanisms of wear – abrasive, adhesive wear, contact
fatigue – fretting corrosion – testing wear resistance practical diagnosis of wear.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. STAND GRAINGER engineering coatings – design and application jaico publishing
House, 1994
REFERENCES:
1. N.V.Parthasarathy, Electroplating Handbooks, Prentice Hall, 1992
2. Metals Hand Book vol.2 8th edition,American society of metals 1994
3. D.R. Gabe, Principles of Metal surface treatment and protection, Pergamon, 1990
4. Niku-Lavi, advances in surface treatments, Pergamon,1990
PR2025 DESIGN OF MACHINE TOOL STRUCTURE L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
Classification of machining processes, machine tools – machine tool construction –
factors – performance criteria – trends in modern machine tool – kinematic arrangement
of different types of machine tools – work holding and tool holding devices – calculation
of cutting forces and power requirements for turning, milling, boring and grinding – force
distribution on different parts of drilling, milling and grinding machine tools.
UNIT II STRENGTH AND RIGIDITY OF MACHINE TOOL STRUCTURES 10
Basic principles of design – comparison of materials used in machine tool construction –
dependence of process capability on rigidity – static compliance – design of lathe beds –
materials – typical construction – torsional modulus of regangular and box sections –
methods of increasing rigidities.
26
UNIT III SLIDEWAYS 9
Slide ways – types – materials – constructions – clearance adjustments – Hydrostatically
lubricated slide ways – slide way design – pressure distribution – antifriction ways –
design – construction.
UNIT IV SPINDLES AND SPINDLE SUPPORTS 8
Spindle units – materials – spindle design – spindle bearings – types of materials –
constructions.
UNIT V MACHINE TOOL DYNAMICS 9
Dynamic system – elastic system – working processes – vibration in machine tools – self
excited vibration and dynamic stability – basic principles of chatter – effects of vibration –
vibration elimination – damping – isolation of vibration – dynamic absorber with damping.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. G.C. Sen and A.Battacharya, “Principles of machine tools”, New central book
agency, 1999
2. N.K.Metha, “Machine Tool Design and Numerical control”, Tata McGraw Hill
publishing company, 1996.
REFERENCES:
1. Manfred week, “Hand Book of machine tools – vol1, vol 2, vol.3 John Wiley & Sons,
1984.
2. Acherkan.N, “Machine Tool Design”, vol 3, MIR publishers, 1978
PR2026 PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT AND PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 7
General principles of management – management functions – organization – types –
comparison – functions of personnel management – recruitment training
leadership/motivation – communication – Conflict industrial relations – trade union.
UNIT II INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 11
Purpose of Inventory – Cost related to inventors – Basic EOQ model – variations in EOQ
model – Finite Production quality discounts – ABC Analysis – MRP Analysis.
UNIT III OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 10
Plant Location – Layout – Materials Handling – Method Study – Time Study –
Ergonomics – Aggregate Planning – Value Analysis
UNIT IV FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 10
Capital – Types – sources – break even analysis – financial statements – income
statement – balance – balance sheet – capital budgeting – working capital management
– inventory pricing.
27
UNIT V MARKETING MANAGEMENT 7
Functions of marketing – Sales promotion methods – advertising – product packaging –
marketing variables – distribution channels – organization – market research market
research techniques.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. R. Kesavan, C.Elanchezhian and T.Sundar Selwyn – Engineering management –
Eswar Press, 2005
2. K. Panneerselvam – Production and Operations Management – Prentice Hall of
India, 2003.
REFERENCES:
1. Koont and G’donnel-Essentials of Management, McGraw Hill 1992.
2. Philips Kotler – Principles of marketing, Prentice Hall of India, 1995
3. I.M. Pandey – Financial Management, Vikas Publishing house, 1995
4. K.K.Ahuja – Personal Management, Kalyane Publication 1992
5. Martand T. Telesand – Industrial and Business management – S.Chand & Co., 2001
PR2027 ERGONOMICS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES:
 To introduce the concepts of man machine systems and techniques of providing
human comfort in man-making work systems.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
Inter disciplinary nature of ergonomics modern ergonomics human performance –
information processing – factors affecting human performance – physical workload and
energy expenditure.
UNIT II WORK SPACE DESIGN 9
Anthropometry – workspace design for standing and seatedworkers – Arrangements of
components within a physical space – Interpersonal aspect of workplace design.
UNIT III DESIGN OF EQUIPMENT 9
Programme factors to be considered, design of displays and controls – design for
maintainability – heat stresses – manual lifting.
UNIT IV DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENT 9
Illumination – Climate – Noise – Vibration – Heat, cold – Lighting design considerations
– Effect of noise on task performance.
UNIT V RECENT ADVANCES AND TRENDS 9
Legislative trends – Trends in work system design – occupational diseases – Application
of Ergonomcis in automobiles.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Martin Helander, A guide to Ergonomics of Manufacturing, TMH, 1996.
28
REFERENCES:
1. Bridger, R.S. Introduction to Ergonomics, McGraw Hill, 1995.
2. Micormic, J. Human factors in Engineering and Design, McGraw Hill, 1992.
3. Wilson,J.R.Corlect EN, Evaluation of Human work, A. practical Ergonomcis
4. methodology, Taylor and Frances, 1990.
5. Shackel, B.Richardson S, Human Factors for Inforamtion usability, Cambridge
University, Cambridge University Press, 1991.
ME2030 COMPOSITE MATERIALS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES:
 To understand the fundamentals of composite material strength and its
mechanical behavior Understanding the analysis of fiber reinforced Laminate
design for different
 combinations of plies with different orientations of the fiber.
 Thermo-mechanical behavior and study of residual stresses in Laminates during
processing. Implementation of Classical Laminate Theory (CLT) to study and
analysis for residual stresses in an isotropic layered structure such as electronic
chips.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION, LAMINA CONSTITUTIVE EQUATIONS &
MANUFACTURING 12
Definition –Need – General Characteristics, Applications. Fibers – Glass, Carbon,
Ceramic and Aramid fibers. Matrices – Polymer, Graphite, Ceramic and Metal Matrices
– Characteristics of fibers and matrices. Lamina Constitutive Equations: Lamina
Assumptions – Macroscopic Viewpoint. Generalized Hooke’s Law. Reduction to
Homogeneous Orthotropic Lamina – Isotropic limit case, Orthotropic Stiffness matrix
(Qij), Typical Commercial material properties, Rule of Mixtures. Generally Orthotropic
Lamina –Transformation Matrix, Transformed Stiffness. Manufacturing: Bag Moulding –
Compression Moulding – Pultrusion – Filament Winding – Other Manufacturing
Processes
UNIT II FLAT PLATE LAMINATE CONSTITUTE EQUATIONS 10
Definition of stress and Moment Resultants. Strain Displacement relations. Basic
Assumptions of Laminated anisotropic plates. Laminate Constitutive Equations –
Coupling Interactions, Balanced Laminates, Symmetric Laminates, Angle Ply Laminates,
Cross Ply Laminates. Laminate Structural Moduli. Evaluation of Lamina Properties from
Laminate Tests. Quasi-Isotropic Laminates. Determination of Lamina stresses within
Laminates.
UNIT III LAMINA STRENGTH ANALYSIS 5
Introduction - Maximum Stress and Strain Criteria. Von-Misses Yield criterion for
Isotropic Materials. Generalized Hill’s Criterion for Anisotropic materials. Tsai-Hill’s
Failure Criterion for Composites. Tensor Polynomial (Tsai-Wu) Failure criterion.
Prediction of laminate Failure
UNIT IV THERMAL ANALYSIS 8
Assumption of Constant C.T.E’s. Modification of Hooke’s Law. Modification of Laminate
Constitutive Equations. Orthotropic Lamina C.T.E’s. C.T.E’s for special Laminate
Configurations – Unidirectional, Off-axis, Symmetric Balanced Laminates, Zero C.T.E
laminates, Thermally Quasi-Isotropic Laminates
29
UNIT V ANALYSIS OF LAMINATED FLAT PLATES 10
Equilibrium Equations of Motion. Energy Formulations. Static Bending Analysis. Buckling
Analysis. Free Vibrations – Natural Frequencies
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Gibson, R.F., Principles of Composite Material Mechanics, McGraw-Hill, 1994,
Second Edition - CRC press in progress.
2. Hyer, M.W., “Stress Analysis of Fiber – Reinforced Composite Materials”, McGraw-
Hill, 1998
REFERENCES:
1. Issac M. Daniel and Ori Ishai, “Engineering Mechanics of Composite Materials”,
Oxford University Press-2006, First Indian Edition - 2007
2. Mallick, P.K., Fiber –”Reinforced Composites: Materials, Manufacturing and Design”,
Maneel Dekker Inc, 1993.
3. Halpin, J.C., “Primer on Composite Materials, Analysis”, Techomic Publishing Co.,
1984.
4. Agarwal, B.D., and Broutman L.J., “Analysis and Performance of Fiber Composites”,
John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1990.
5. Mallick, P.K. and Newman, S., (edition), “Composite Materials Technology:
Processes and Properties”, Hansen Publisher, Munish, 1990.
PR2028 PROCESSING OF POLYMER AND COMPOSITES L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 8
Classification of polymers – properties and applications of selective engineering
polymers – fundamentals of composites – need for composites – enhancement of
properties – classification of composites – matrix polymer matrix composites (PMC),
metal matrix composites (MMC), Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) reinforcement –
particle reinforced composites, fibre reinforced composites, applications of various types
of composites.
UNIT II POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES 12
Polymer matrix resins – thermosetting resins, thermoplastic resins – reinforcement fibres
– rovings – woven fabrics – non woven random mats – various types of fibres, PMC
processes – hand lay up processes – spray lay up processes – compression moulding –
reinforced reaction injection moulding – resin transfer moulding – poltrusion – filament
winding – injection moulding fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) (Glass fibre reinforced
plastics (GRP).
UNIT III METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES 9
Characteristics of MMC, various types of metal matrix composites alloy vs. MMC,
advantages of MMC limitations of MMC – Metal matrix – reinforcements – particles –
fibres. Effect of reinforcement – volume fraction – Rule of mixtures, processing of MMC
– Powder metallurgy process diffusion bonding – stir casting squeeze casting.
UNIT IV CERAMICS MATRIX COMPOSITES 9
Engineering ceramic materials – properties – advantages – limitations – Monolithic
ceramics – Need for CMC – Ceramic matrix – various types of ceramic matrix
composites – oxide ceramics – non oxide ceramics – aluminium oxide – silicon nitride –
30
reinforcements – particles – fibres – whiskers. Sintering- Hot pressing – Cold isostatic
pressing (CIPing) – Hot isostatic pressing (HIPing).
UNIT V ADVANCES IN POLYMERS & COMPOSITES 7
Carbon/carbon composites – advantages of carbon matrix – limitations of carbon matrix
carbon fibre – chemical vapour deposition of carbon on carbon fibre perform. Solgel
technique. Composites for aerospace industrial applications. TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Mathews F.L. and Rawings R.D., “Composite materials, Engineering and Science”,
Chapman.
2. Chawla K.K. “Composite Materails”, Springer Verlag, 1987
3. Kenneth G.Budinski & Michael K. Budinski, “Engineering Materials”, Prentice Hall of
India pvt ltd., 4th Indian reprint, 2002
REFERENCES:
1. T.W.Clync and P.J. Withers, “Introduction to Metal Matrix Composites”. Cambridge
University Press, 1993.
2. B.Strong, “Fundamentals of composite manufacturing, SME, 1989
3. S.C.Sharma, “Composite materials”, Narosa publications, 2000
4. “Short term course on advances in composite materials”, “composite technology
centre, department of metallurgy, iit – madras, December 2001.
5. Brydson, Hand book of plastic processing
6. Weatherhead R.G. “FRP technology” (Fibre Reinforced Resin System), Applied
Science Publishers Limited, London, 1990.
PR2029 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS & FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 13
Accounting principles – basic records depreciation – depreciation methods – preparation
and interpretation of profit and loss statement – balance sheet – fixed assets – current
assets.
UNIT II PROFIT VALUE ANALYSIS 10
Cost valume profit relationship – relevant costs in decision making profit management
analysis – break even analysis – margin of safety Angle of incident & multi product break
even analysis – Effect of changes in volume selling price fixed cost and variable cost on
profit.
UNIT III WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 8
Current assets and liability decisions – estimation of working capital requirements –
Management of accounts receivable – Inventory – cash – inventory valuation methods.
UNIT IV CAPITAL BUDGETING 7
Significance of capital budgeting – payback period – present value method – Accounting
rate of return method.
UNIT V ENGINEERING ECONOMICS 7
Economics – Engineering economics – Demand analysis Laws of demand – Production
and cost – Pricing methods
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
31
TEXT BOOKS:
1. R. Kesavan, C.Elanchezhian and T.Sundar Selwyn – Engineering Economics and
Financial Accounting, Laxmi Publications 2005
2. S.N.Maheswaran, Management Accounting and Financial Control, Sultan Chand,
1992.
REFERENCES:
1. C.James, Vanhorn, Fundamentals of Financial management PHI 1996
2. Charles T.Homgren, Cost Accounting, PHI 1985.
PR2030 PURCHASING AND MATERIALS MANAGEMENT L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I FUNCTIONS OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT 6
Introduction to materials management – objectives – Organization – Functions –
Operating Cycle – Value analysis – Make or buy decisions.
UNIT II PURCHASING MANAGEMENT 8
Purchasing policies and procedures – Selection of sources of supply – Vendor
development – Vendor evaluation and rating – Methods of purchasing – Imports – Buyer
– Seller relationship – Negotiations - Insurance and claims managements
UNIT III STORES MANAGEMENT 8
Store function – Location – Layout – Stock taking – Materials handling – codification –
Inventory pricing – MIS for stores management
UNIT IV MATERIALS PLANNING 12
Forecasting - ABC analysis – Materials requirements planning - Inventory systems –
Quantity – periodic – Deterministic models – Aggregate planning – JIT.
UNIT V INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 11
Basic EOQ Model – Discount Model - Finite Production – Lot size under constraints –
Application of O.R. Techniques in Materials Management.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Lamer Lee and Donald W.Dobler, Purchasing and Material Management, Text and
Cases, Tata McGraw Hill, 1996.
REFERENCES:
1. Gopalakrishnan P.Handbook of Materials Management, Prentice Hall of India, 1996.
2. Guptha P.K. and Manmohan, Problems in Operations Research, Sultan Chand &
Sons, 1994
3. R. Kesavan, C.Elanchezhian and T.Sundar Selwyn, Engineering Management,
Eswar Press 2005
32
ME2038 OPERATIONS RESEARCH L T P C
3 0 0 3
(Common To Mechanical, Metallurgy, Automobile And Mechatronics –
VI Semester Elective)
OBJECTIVE:
 To create awareness about optimization in utilization of resources.
 To understand and apply operations research techniques to industrial operations.
UNIT I LINEAR MODEL 10
The phases of OR study – formation of an L.P model- graphical solution – simplex
algorithm – artificial variables technique– Big M method, two phase method, Duality in
LPP. Transportation problems- VAM – MODI technique, Assignment problems.
UNIT II NETWORK MODELS 8
Shortest route – minimal spanning tree - maximum flow models – project network- CPM
and PERT network-critical path scheduling.
UNIT II INVENTORY MODEL 9
Types of Inventory- EOQ –ERL- Deterministic inventory problems – Price breaks -
Stochastic inventory problems- selective inventory control techniques.
UNIT II REPLACEMENT MODELS 9
Replacement of items that deteriorate with time – value of money changing with time –
not charging with time – optimum replacement policy – individual and group
replacement. Sequencing problem: models with n jobs with 2 machines – problem with n
jobs with m machines.
UNIT III QUEUING THEORY 9
Queuing models – queuing systems and structures – notation –parameter – single
server and multiserver models – Poisson input – exponential service – constant rate
service – infinite population.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Wayne.L.Winston, Operations research applications and algorithms, Thomson
learning,4th edition 2007.
2. Taha H.A, “Operation Research”, Pearson Education sixth edition, 2003
REFERENCES:
1. Frederick.S.Hiller and Gerald.J.Lieberman, “Operations research concepts and
cases”, TMH (SIE) 8th edition.
2. J.K.Sharma, “Operations research theory and applications”, Macmillan India .3rd
edition 2007,
3. Hira and Gupta “ Problems in Operations Research”, S.Chand and Co,2002.
4. Panneerselvam, “Operations Research” Prentice Hall of India, 2003.
5. G Srinivasan, “Operations research principles and applications”, PHI (EEE) 2007.
6. Wagner, “Operations Research”, Prentice Hall of India, 2000.
33
PR2031 NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge on Non Destructive Testing procedures.
OBJECTIVES :
 To understand principle behind various NDT techniques.
 To study about NDT equipments and accessories.
 To learn working procedures of various NDT techniques.
PRE-REQUISITES:
Basic knowledge on various process defects
UNIT I NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING: AN INTRODUCTION 6
Introduction to various non-destructive methods- Comparison of Destructive and Non
destructive Tests, Visual Inspection, Optical aids used for visual inspection, Applications.
UNIT II LIQUID PENETRANT TESTING AND MAGNETIC PARTICLE TESTING 10
Physical principles, procedure for penetrant testing, Penetrant testing materials,
Penetrant testing methods – Applications
Principle of MPT, Magnetising technical and procedure used for testing a component ,
Equipment used for MPT , Applications
UNIT III EDDY CURRENT TESTING AND ACOUSTIC
EMISSION TESTING 10
Principles, Instrumentation for ECT, Various Techniques – High sensitivity Techniques,
Single, Multi and high frequency ECT, Applications
Principle of AET,AE signal parameters, Applications.
UNIT IV ULTRASONIC TESTING 10
Principle, Ultrasonic transducers, Inspection Methods – Normal Incident Pulse-echo
Inspection, Through - transmission Testing, angle Beam Pulse-echo testing, Techniques
for Normal Beam Inspection, Ultrasonic Flaw detection Equipment, Modes of display –
A- scan, B-Scan & C- Scan- Applications
UNIT V RADIOGRAPHY, COMPARISON AND SELECTION OF NDT
METHODS 09
Basic principle, Effect of radiation on Film, Radiographic imaging – Inspection
Techniques – Single wall single image, Double wall Penetration & Multiwall Penetration
technique – Comparison and selection of various NDT techniques
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Baldev raj, T Jeyakumar, M. Thavasimuthu “Practical Non Destructive Testing”
Narosa publishing house, New Delhi, 2002
REFERENCES:
1. Krautkramer. J., “Ultra Sonic Testing of Materials”, 1st Edition, Springer – Verlag
Publication, New York, 1996.
2. Peter J. Shull “Non Destructive Evaluation: Theory, Techniques and Application”
Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, 2002
3. www.ndt.net
4. Baldev Raj and B.Venkataraman, “Practical Radiology”, Narosa Publishing House,
2004
5. Birchan.B, “Non-Destructive Testing”, Oxford, London, 1975
34
PR2032 SIMULATION OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To introduce the concepts of simulation and to apply them for manufacturing
system
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 8
Basic concept of system – elements of manufacturing system - concept of simulation –
simulation as a decision making tool – types of simulation – system modeling – types of
modeling.
UNIT II RANDOM NUMBERS 10
Probability and statistical concepts of simulation – Pseudo random numbers – methods
of generating random numbers – discrete and continuous distribution – testing of
random numbers – sampling - simple, random and simulated.
UNIT III DESIGN OF SIMULATION EXPERIMENTS 10
Problem formulation – data collection and reduction – time flow mechanical – key
variables - logic flow chart starting condition – run size – experimental design
consideration – output analysis, interpretation and validation – application of simulation
in engineering industry.
UNIT IV SIMULATION LANGUAGE 7
Study of GPSS (Basic blocks only) Generate, Queue, Depart, Size, Release, Advance,
Terminate, Transfer, Enter and Leave.
UNIT V CASE STUDIES 10
Development of simulation models using GPSS for queuing, production, inventory,
maintenance and replacement systems, (Students may be asked to prepare and present
the case studies)
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Jerry Banks and John S.Carson, “Discrete event system simulation”, Prentice Hall
1991
REFERENCES:
1. John H.Mize and J.Grady Cox, “Essential of simulation” – Prentice hall 1989.
2. Geoffrey Gordon “System simulation” – Prentice Hall of India, 1992
3. Jeffrey L.Written, Lonnie D, Bentley and V.M. Barice, “System analysis and Design
Methods”, Galgotia publication, 1995
4. Averill M.Law and W.David Kelton, “Simulation Modelling and analysis”, McGraw Hill
International Editions, 1991
5. Shannon R.E., “System simulation”, Prentice Hall 1993.
35
PR2033 RELIABILITY ENGINEERING L T P C
3 1 0 3
OBJECTIVES:
 To stress the importance of reliability in Engineering and products also the
concept of maintability, failure modes and testing methods.
UNIT I CONCEPTS OF RELIABILITY, SYSTEM AND MODELS 12
Definition of reliability – reliability Vs quality-reliability function-MTTF – hazard rate
function- bathtub curve – derivation of the reliability function-constant failure rate model
– time dependent failure models. Weibull distribution – normal distribution – the
lognormal distribution. Serial configuration – parallel configuration – combined series
parallel systems – system structure function, minimal cuts and minimal paths – Markov
analysis – load sharing systems, standby system, degraded systems, three state
devices – covariate models, static models, dynamic models, physics of failure models
UNIT II DESIGN FOR RELIABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY 12
Reliability design process – system effectiveness – economic analysis and life cycle cost
– reliability allocation – optimal, Arinc, Agree, - Design methods – parts and material
selection, derating, stress-strength analysis – failure analysis – identification of failure
mode – determination of causes – assessment of effects – classification of seventy –
computation of critically index – corrective action – system safety and FTA. Analysis of
downtime – the repair time distribution – stochastic point processes – system repair time
– reliability under preventive maintenance – state dependent systems with repair –
MTTR-mean system downtime – MTR – MH/OH – cost model – fault isolation and self
diagnostics – repair Vs replacement – replacement model – proactive, preventive,
predictive maintenance – maintenance and spares provisioning – maintainability
prediction and demonstration – concepts and definition of availability.
UNIT III OPTIMIZATION OF SYSTEM RELIABILITY 7
Optimization techniques for system reliability with redundancy – heuristic methods
applied to optimal system reliability- redundancy allocation by dynamic programming –
reliability optimization by non linear programming.
UNIT IV THE ANALYSIS OF FAILURE DATA AND RELIABILITY TESTING 7
Data collection – empirical methods – ungrouped and grouped complete, censored data
– static life estimation – test time calculation – burn in testing, acceptance, sequential,
binomial testing – accelerated life testing – ther acceleration models – experimental
design – reliability growth process – idealized growth curve – various growth models –
identifying failure and repair distributions.
UNIT V PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION FOR RELIABILITY 7
Objectives – preservation-packaging – transportation and subsequent storage –
reliability and the customer - Purchase of equipment – installation – commissioning a
new system – reliability prediction and control – reliability management – the people
concerned with reliability, coordination, training
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Charles E. Ebling, “An introduction to Reliability and Maintainability Engg”, Tata
McGraw-Hill, 2000.
36
REFERENCES:
1. Patrick D T o’connor, “Practical Reliability Engineringt”, John-Wiley and Sons inc,
2002.
2. David J Smith, “Reliability, Maintainability and Risk: Practical Methods for
Engineers”, Butterworth, 2002
3. Way kuo, Rajendra Prasad V, Frank A and Tillman, ching- lai Hwang “Optimal
Reliability Design and Applciations”, Cambridge University Press P ltd., 2001.
4. Srinath I.S, Engineering Design and Reliability, ISTE, 1999.
5. Oleg Vinogradov, “Introduction to Mechanical Reliability: A Designers Approach,
Hemisphere Publications, 1991.
PR2034 MACHINE TOOL CONTROL & CONDITION MONITORING L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To understand the control system of machine tools and its applications
 To understand the objectives, aims and methodology of machine tool condition
monitoring and diagnostics.
UNIT I OVERVIEW OF AUTOMATIC CONTROLS IN MACHINE TOOLS 6
Open loop – closed loop system – block diagram representation of machine tool control
systems.
UNIT II COMPUTER CONTROL SYSTEM 15
Process computer-peripherals – Data logger-Direct digital control-Supervisory computer
control-Adaptive control-types-adaptive control for turning, milling, grinding and EDMProgrammable
logic controller-Functions-applications in machine tools.
UNIT III DRIVE SYSTEMS IN MACHINE TOOLS 8
Electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic types – servo motor-stepper motor-ball screw
mechanism. Feed back devices-Syncro, resolver, diffraction gratings, potentiometer,
and inductosyn-encoders-application in machine tools.
UNIT IV CONDITION MONITORING 8
Condition monitoring techniques – Visual, temperature, vibration, lubricant, thickness,
noise and sound. Condition monitoring of machine tools.
UNIT V MACHINE TOOL DIAGNOSTICS 8
Objectives-aims-examples of monitoring and diagnosis-control structures for machine
diagnosis-utilization of diagnostic results.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCES:
1. Manfred weck, “Hand book of machine tools – Vol.3, John Wiley & Sons, 1984.
2. Sushil Kumar Srivstava “ industrial maintenance management” S.Chand & company
ltd., New Delhi, 1998.
3. Mikell P.Groover, “Automation Production system and Computer Integrated
Manufacturing”, Prentice Hall of India, Pvt.Ltd., 1995.
37
PR2035 MINI PROJECT L T P C
3 0 6 3
OBJECTIVES:
1. The students in batches (not exceeding three in a batch) have to take up a project in
the area of manufacturing engineering.
2. Each batch is guided by a faculty member. The students have to select a suitable
problems, design, prepare the drawings, produce the components, assemble and
commission the project.
3. The students have to prepare and present a detailed project report at the end of the
VIII Semester
4. The evaluation will be made for the continuous internal assessment for the Project by
a committee nominated by the Head of the Department.
PR2036 MACHINE VISION L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To understand the principle, importance and application of machine vision
system in Manufacturing and measurement.
UNIT – I INTRODUCTION TO MACHINE VISION 6
Machine Vision use of machine vision – tasks for a vision system – relation to other
fields – place of vision in CIM.
UNIT – II IMAGE ACQUISITION AND CONVERSION 6
Colour systems – light sources – lighting techniques – image formation by lensing –
image scanning – television cameras – sensors, charge coupled devices – camera and
system interface – frame buffers and frame grabbers – digital and smart camers.
UNIT – III IMAGE PROCESSING DECISION MAKING 12
Processing of binary images – thresholding, geometrical properties, topological
properties – processing of gray scale images statistical operations, spatial operations,
segmentation edge detection, morphological operations – image analysis – factors
extraction – decision making.
UNIT – IV PATTERN RECOGNITION 9
Fundamentals – parametric classifiers – nonparametric, classifiers nearest neighbor
CART, neural networks, generic classifiers.
UNIT – V MACHINE VISION APPLICATIONS 12
Applications in user industries automotive, semiconductor, electronic manufacturing,
printing industries etc. – generic applications founding manufacturing metrology,
inspection assembly verification – application analysis and implementation.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCES:
1. Milan sonka, Vaclav hlavac, roger boyie, image processing, analysis and machine
vision publisher, 1995
2. Richard O.Duda, Peter E. Hurt, Pattern Classification and Scene Analysis Publisher,
1973
3. Rafael C. Gonzaies, Richard E. Woods, Digital Image processing publisher, 1992
4. Nella zuech, ‘Understanding & applying machine vision Marceldekker Inc. 2000.
38
PR2037 ADVANCES IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To introduce the advanced OR models and to apply them for Engineering
problems
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 5
Optimization – Historical Development – Engineering applications of optimization –
Statement of an Optimization problem – classification of optimization problems.
UNIT II CLASSIC OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES 10
Linear programming - Graphical method – simplex method – dual simplex method –
revised simplex method – duality in LP – Parametric Linear programming.
UNIT III NON-LINEAR PROGRAMMING 9
Introduction – Lagrangeon Method – Kuhn-Tucker conditions – Quadratic programming
– Separable programming – Stochastic programming
UNIT IV INTEGER PROGRAMMING 11
Cutting plane algorithm – Branch and bound technique - Zero-one implicit enumeration;
Goal programming – geometric programming; Network Techniques –
Shortest Path Model – Minimum Spanning Tree Problem – Maximal flow problem.
UNIT V DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING 10
Formulation – Application to capital budgeting, reliability improvement, shortest path,
solution of LP using DP.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. R. Panneerselvam, “Operations Research”, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited,
New Delhi 1 – 2005
REFERENCES:
1. P.K. Guptha and Man-Mohan, Problems in Operations Research – Sultan chand &
Sons, 1994
2. Ravindran, Philips and Solberg, Operations Research Principles and Practice, John
Wiley & Sons, Singapore, 1992
3. J.K.Sharma, Operations Research – Theory and Applications – Macmillan India Ltd.,
1997
4. Hamdy A. Taha, Operations Research – An Introduction, Prentice Hall of India, 1997
GE2021 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS IN ENGINEERING L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I ENGINEERING ETHICS 9
Senses of ‘Engineering Ethics’ – Variety of moral issues – Types of inquiry – Moral
dilemmas – Moral Autonomy – Kohlberg’s theory – Gilligan’s theory – Consensus and
Controversy – Professions and Professionalism – Professional Ideals and Virtues –
Uses of Ethical Theories
39
UNIT II ENGINEERING AS SOCIAL EXPERIMENTATION 9
Engineering as Experimentation – Engineers as responsible Experimenters – Research
Ethics - Codes of Ethics – Industrial Standards - A Balanced Outlook on Law – The
Challenger Case Study
UNIT III ENGINEER’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR SAFETY 9
Safety and Risk – Assessment of Safety and Risk – Risk Benefit Analysis – Reducing
Risk – The Government Regulator’s Approach to Risk - Chernobyl Case Studies and
Bhopal
UNIT IV RESPONSIBILITIES AND RIGHTS 9
Collegiality and Loyalty – Respect for Authority – Collective Bargaining – Confidentiality
– Conflicts of Interest – Occupational Crime – Professional Rights – Employee Rights –
Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) - Discrimination
UNIT V GLOBAL ISSUES 9
Multinational Corporations – Business Ethics - Environmental Ethics – Computer Ethics -
Role in Technological Development – Weapons Development – Engineers as Managers
– Consulting Engineers – Engineers as Expert Witnesses and Advisors – Honesty –
Moral Leadership – Sample Code of Conduct
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Mike Martin and Roland Schinzinger, “Ethics in Engineering”, McGraw Hill, New York
(2005).
2. Charles E Harris, Michael S Pritchard and Michael J Rabins, “Engineering Ethics –
Concepts and Cases”, Thompson Learning, (2000).
REFERENCES:
1. Charles D Fleddermann, “Engineering Ethics”, Prentice Hall, New Mexico, (1999).
2. John R Boatright, “Ethics and the Conduct of Business”, Pearson Education, (2003)
3. Edmund G Seebauer and Robert L Barry, “Fundamentals of Ethics for Scientists and
Engineers”, Oxford University Press, (2001)
4. Prof. (Col) P S Bajaj and Dr. Raj Agrawal, “Business Ethics – An Indian Perspective”,
Biztantra, New Delhi, (2004)
5. David Ermann and Michele S Shauf, “Computers, Ethics and Society”, Oxford
University Press, (2003)
GE2023 FUNDAMENTALS OF NANOSCIENCE L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
Nanoscale Science and Technology- Implications for Physics, Chemistry, Biology and
Engineering-Classifications of nanostructured materials- nano particles- quantum dots,
nanowires-ultra-thinfilms-multilayered materials. Length Scales involved and effect on
properties: Mechanical, Electronic, Optical, Magnetic and Thermal properties.
Introduction to properties and motivation for study (qualitative only).
UNIT II PREPARATION METHODS 10
Bottom-up Synthesis-Top-down Approach: Precipitation, Mechanical Milling, Colloidal
routes, Self-assembly, Vapour phase deposition, MOCVD, Sputtering, Evaporation,
Molecular Beam Epitaxy, Atomic Layer Epitaxy, MOMBE.
40
UNITIII PATTERNING AND LITHOGRAPHY FOR NANOSCALE DEVICES 7
Introduction to optical/UV electron beam and X-ray Lithography systems and processes,
Wet etching, dry (Plasma /reactive ion) etching, Etch resists-dip pen lithography
UNIT IV PREPARATION ENVIRONMENTS 9
Clean rooms: specifications and design, air and water purity, requirements for particular
processes, Vibration free environments: Services and facilities required. Working
practices, sample cleaning, Chemical purification, chemical and biological
contamination, Safety issues, flammable and toxic hazards, biohazards.
UNIT V CHARECTERISATION TECHNIQUES 10
X-ray diffraction technique, Scanning Electron Microscopy - environmental techniques,
Transmission Electron Microscopy including high-resolution imaging, Surface Analysis
techniques- AFM, SPM, STM, SNOM, ESCA, SIMS-Nanoindentation
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. A.S. Edelstein and R.C. Cammearata, eds., “Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Properties
and Applications”, Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol and Philadelphia, 1996.
2. N John Dinardo, “Nanoscale charecterisation of surfaces & Interfaces”, 2nd Edition,
Weinheim Cambridge, Wiley-VCH, 2000
REFERENCES:
1. G Timp (Editor), “Nanotechnology”, AIP press/Springer, 1999
2. Akhlesh Lakhtakia (Editor), “The Hand Book of Nano Technology,Nanometer
Structure”, Theory, Modeling and Simulations”, Prentice-Hall of India (P) Ltd, New
Delhi, 2007.
ME2035 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT L T P C
(common to all branches) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 Study of this subject provides an understanding of the scope of an entrepreneur,
key areas of development, financial assistance by the institutions, methods of
taxation and tax benefits, etc.
UNIT I ENTREPRENEURSHIP 9
Entrepreneur – Types of Entrepreneurs – Difference between Entrepreneur and
Intrapreneur – Entrepreneurship in Economic Growth, Factors Affecting Entrepreneurical
Growth.
UNIT II MOTIVATION 9
Major Motives Influencing an Entrepreneur – Achievement Motivation Training, self
Rating, Business Game, Thematic Apperception Test – Stress management,
Entrepreneurship Development Programs – Need, Objectives.
41
UNIT III BUSINESS 9
Small Enterprises – Definition, Classification – Characteristics, Ownership Structures –
Project Formulation – Steps involved in setting up a Business – identifying, selecting a
Good Business opportunity, Market Survey and Research, Techno Economic Feasibility
Assessment – Preparation of Preliminary Project Reports – Project Appraisal – Sources
of Information – Classification of Needs and Agencies.
UNIT IV FINANCING AND ACCOUNTING 9
Need – Sources of Finance, Term Loans, Capital Structure, Financial Institution,
management of working Capital, Costing, Break Even Analysis, Network Analysis
Techniques of PERT/CPM – Taxation – Income Tax, Excise Duty – Sales Tax.
UNIT V SUPPORT TO ENTREPRENEURS 9
Sickness in small Business – Concept, Magnitude, causes and consequences,
Corrective Measures – Government Policy for Small Scale Enterprises – Growth
Strategies in small industry – Expansion, Diversification, Joint Venture, Merger and Sub
Contracting.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. S.S.Khanka “Entrepreneurial Development” S.Chand & Co. Ltd. Ram Nagar New
Delhi, 1999.
2. Kuratko & Hodgetts, “Enterprenuership – Theory, process and practices”, Thomson
learning 6th edition.
REFERENCES:
1. Hisrich R D and Peters M P, “Entrepreneurship” 5th Edition Tata McGraw-Hill, 2002.
2. Mathew J Manimala,” Enterprenuership theory at cross roads: paradigms and praxis”
Dream tech 2nd edition 2006.
3. Rabindra N. Kanungo “Entrepreneurship and innovation”, Sage Publications, New
Delhi, 1998.
4. EDII “ Faulty and External Experts – A Hand Book for New Entrepreneurs
Publishers: Entrepreneurship Development” Institute of India, Ahmadabad, 1986.
ME2036 PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL L T P C
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVE:
 To understand the various components and functions of production planning and
control such as work study, product planning, process planning, production
scheduling, Inventory Control.
 To know the recent trends like manufacturing requirement Planning (MRP II) and
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP).
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
Objectives and benefits of planning and control-Functions of production control-Types of
production-job- batch and continuous-Product development and design-Marketing
aspect - Functional aspects-Operational aspect-Durability and dependability aspectaesthetic
aspect. Profit consideration-Standardization, Simplification & specialization-
Break even analysis-Economics of a new design.
42
UNIT II WORK STUDY 9
Method study, basic procedure-Selection-Recording of process - Critical analysis,
Development - Implementation - Micro motion and memo motion study - work
measurement - Techniques of work measurement - Time study - Production study -
Work sampling - Synthesis from standard data - Predetermined motion time standards.
UNIT III PRODUCT PLANNING AND PROCESS PLANNING 9
Product planning-Extending the original product information-Value analysis-Problems in
lack of product planning-Process planning and routing-Pre requisite information needed
for process planning-Steps in process planning-Quantity determination in batch
production-Machine capacity, balancing-Analysis of process capabilities in a multi
product system.
UNIT IV PRODUCTION SCHEDULING 9
Production Control Systems-Loading and scheduling-Master Scheduling-Scheduling
rules-Gantt charts-Perpetual loading-Basic scheduling problems - Line of balance - Flow
production scheduling-Batch production scheduling-Product sequencing - Production
Control systems-Periodic batch control-Material requirement planning kanban –
Dispatching-Progress reporting and expediting-Manufacturing lead time-Techniques for
aligning completion times and due dates.
UNIT V INVENTORY CONTROL AND RECENT TRENDS IN PPC 9
Inventory control-Purpose of holding stock-Effect of demand on inventories-Ordering
procedures. Two bin system -Ordering cycle system-Determination of Economic order
quantity and economic lot size-ABC analysis-Recorder procedure-Introduction to
computer integrated production planning systems-elements of JUST IN TIME
SYSTEMS-Fundamentals of MRP II and ERP.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Martand Telsang, “Industrial Engineering and Production Management”, S. Chand
and Company, First edition, 2000.
2. James.B.Dilworth,”Operations management – Design, Planning and Control for
manufacturing and services” Mcgraw Hill International edition1992.
REFERENCES:
1. Samson Eilon, “Elements of production planning and control”, Universal Book
Corpn.1984
2. Elwood S.Buffa, and Rakesh K.Sarin, “Modern Production / Operations
Management”, 8th Ed. John Wiley and Sons, 2000.
3. Kanishka Bedi, “ Production and Operations management”, Oxford university press,
2nd Edition 2007.
4. Melynk, Denzler, “ Operations management – A value driven approach” Irwin
Mcgrawhill.
5. Norman Gaither, G. Frazier, “ operations management” Thomson learning 9th edition
IE, 2007
6. K.C.Jain & L.N. Aggarwal, “Production Planning Control and Industrial Management”,
Khanna Publishers, 1990.
7. S.N.Chary, “Theory and Problems in Production & Operations Management”, Tata
McGraw Hill, 1995.
8. Upendra Kachru, “ Production and operations management – Text and cases” Excel
books 1st edition 2007.
43
ME2037 MAINTENANCE ENGINEERING L T P C
(COMMON TO MECHANICAL AND PRODUCTION) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES:
 To enable the student to understand the principles, functions and practices
adapted in industry for the successful management of maintenance activities.
 To explain the different maintenance categories like Preventive maintenance,
condition monitoring and repair of machine elements.
 To illustrate some of the simple instruments used for condition monitoring in
industry.
UNIT I PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF MAINTENANCE PLANNING 10
Basic Principles of maintenance planning – Objectives and principles of planned
maintenance activity – Importance and benefits of sound Maintenance systems –
Reliability and machine availability – MTBF, MTTR and MWT – Factors of availability –
Maintenance organization – Maintenance economics.
UNIT II MAINTENANCE POLICIES – PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE 9
Maintenance categories – Comparative merits of each category – Preventive
maintenance, maintenance schedules, repair cycle - Principles and methods of
lubrication – TPM.
UNIT III CONDITION MONITORING 9
Condition Monitoring – Cost comparison with and without CM – On-load testing and offload
testing – Methods and instruments for CM – Temperature sensitive tapes – Pistol
thermometers – wear-debris analysis
UNIT IV REPAIR METHODS FOR BASIC MACHINE ELEMENTS 10
Repair methods for beds, slideways, spindles, gears, lead screws and bearings – Failure
analysis – Failures and their development – Logical fault location methods – Sequential
fault location.
UNIT V REPAIR METHODS FOR MATERIAL HANDLING EQUIPMENT 7
Repair methods for Material handling equipment - Equipment records –Job order
systems -Use of computers in maintenance.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Srivastava S.K., “Industrial Maintenance Management”, - S. Chand and Co., 1981
2. Bhattacharya S.N., “Installation, Servicing and Maintenance”, S. Chand and Co.,
1995
REFERENCES:
1. White E.N., “Maintenance Planning”, I Documentation, Gower Press, 1979.
2. Garg M.R., “Industrial Maintenance”, S. Chand & Co., 1986.
3. Higgins L.R., “Maintenance Engineering Hand book”, McGraw Hill, 5th Edition, 1988.
4. Armstrong, “Condition Monitoring”, BSIRSA, 1988.
5. Davies, “Handbook of Condition Monitoring”, Chapman &Hall, 1996.
6. “Advances in Plant Engineering and Management”, Seminar Proceedings - IIPE,
1996.
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