MARINE ENGINEERING Syllabus Anna University

1
AFFILIATED INSTITUTIONS
ANNA UNIVERSITY CHENNAI : : CHENNAI – 600 025
CURRICULUM 2008
B.E. MARINE ENGINEERING
(To be followed from the Academic year 2008 – 2009 onwards)
SEMESTER VI
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
PRACTICAL
MV2351 Marine Workshop Practical and afloat training 8hrs per day
– 6 days a
week, 26
weeks, 500
Marks.
Sessional
Marks 200
Report + Viva
300
12
SEMESTER VII
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
THEORY
MV2401 Marine System and Machinery design 2 2 0 3
MV2402 Marine Electrical Technology 3 0 0 3
MV2403 Marine Vehicles Performance 2 2 0 3
MV2404 Marine Auxiliary Machinery – II 3 0 0 3
MV2405 Ship’s Fire Prevention and Control 3 0 0 3
Elective – I 3 0 0 3
Elective – II 3 0 0 3
PRACTICAL
MV2406 Fire Fighting, Controls and Simulator Lab 0 0 4 3
MV2407 Marine Propulsion and Auxiliary Machineries
Overhauling Lab 0 0 4 2
GE 2321 Communication Skills Lab 0 0 4 2
19 4 12 28
SEMESTER –VIII
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
THEORY
GE 2211 Environmental Science and Engineering 3 0 0 3
MV2451 Ship Operational Management and IMO Requirements 3 0 0 3
MV2452 Marine Control Engineering and Automation 3 0 0 3
MV2453 Safety Precautions and Watch Keeping 3 0 0 3
Elective – III 3 0 0 3
PRACTICAL
MV 2454 Comprehension Test 0 0 2 1
MV 2455 Project work, Technical Paper and Viva Voce 0 0 12 6
15 0 14 22
2
ELECTIVES
VII – SEMESTER
ELECTIVES – I
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
GE 2022 Total Quality Management 3 0 0 3
GE 2021 Professional Ethics In Engineering 3 0 0 3
MV 2020 Double Hull Tankers 3 0 0 3
MV 2021 Maritime Economics & Insurance 3 0 0 3
ELECTIVES – II
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
MV 2022 Marine Propellers and Propulsion 3 0 0 3
MV 2023 Advanced Marine Heat Engines 3 0 0 3
MV 2024 Supercharging and scavenging in Marine Diesel
Engines
3 0 0 3
MV 2025 Ship safety and environmental protection 3 0 0 3
VIII – SEMESTER
ELECTIVES – III
CODE NO. COURSE TITLE L T P C
MV 2026 Ship Recycling 3 0 0 3
MV 2027 Marine corrosion and prevention 3 0 0 3
MV 2028 Special duty vessels and type of operation 3 0 0 3
MV 2029 Marine system modelling and simulation 3 0 0 3
TOTAL NO OF CREDITS: 200
3
MV2351 MARINE WORKSHOP PRACTICAL AND AFLOAT TRAINING 12
The students are required to undergo Marine Workshop Training in DG Shipping
approved Marine Engineering Workshop for a duration of 6 months. The training should
be as per the Merchant Shipping (Standard of Training Certification and Watch keeping
for Seafarers) Rule 1998.
Competency on -use of hand tools used for marine equipments for dismantling,
maintenance, repair and reassembly of shipboard equipments.
100 hrs.
Competency on - use of hand tools used for electrical and electronic
equipments, measuring and test equipment’s for locating and
repairing faults and malfunctions. 100 hrs.
Competency on -Operation of Main and Auxillary machinery and associated
control systems. 30 hrs.
Competency on - Operating pumping systems & associated control systems. 90 hrs.
Competency on - Operating alternators , generators & control systems. 100 hrs.
Competency on - Maintaining alternators, generators and Control systems. 20 hrs.
Competency on -Maintaining Marine Engineering system including control systems
(overhauling and maintenance of Marine Diesel Engines, air
compressors, heat exchangers, oil separators etc.,) 700 hrs.
Competency on - Controlling and fighting fire onboard. 6 hrs.
Competency on - Operation of life saving appliances. 6 hrs.
------------
Total hrs. of Training: 1152 hrs. ------------
The competency of the students are evaluated by the Marine Engineering Workshop
and a report is sent to the college. During the training the students have to maintain a
work dairy. After completion of this training the students will be examined as follows:
a)Assessment on work diary (Internal) 200 Marks.
b)*(i) Written test for 1 hour. 10 questions 10 X 10 = 100 Marks
(ii) Viva voce 200 Marks
--------------
Total 500 Marks
--------------
* Valuation by both Internal and External Examiners.
One Professor has to constantly monitor the progress of the Workshop training.
4
MV2401 MARINE SYSTEM AND MACHINERY DESIGN L T P C
2 2 0 3
AIM
To impart training and knowledge to the students about Marine Machinery system and
Design.
OBJECTIVE
 At the completion of the course the students are expected to have knowledge of,
 Different types of Bearings.
 Design of IC Engine parts and gears.
 Design of Marine Machinery systems.
UNIT I 11+3
Sliding contact bearings: Journal bearings, thrust bearings, friction in journal bearings,
bearing loads, bearing design using various equations. Thermal Equilibrium.
Rolling Contact Bearings: Load ratings, types of radial ball bearings, selection of
bearings, lubrication of ball and roller bearings, methods of failure.
UNIT II 9+3
Spur and Helical Gears: Basic design principles of spur gears, helical gears, dynamic
tooth loads, design for strength and wear. Lewis and Buckingham equations.
Bevel and Worm Gears: Basic design principles of bevel gears and worm gears, Lewis
formula, thermal rating of worm gears.
UNIT III 7+3
IC engine parts: Piston, connecting rod with bearings, crankshaft, flywheel and rocker
arms.
UNIT IV 7+3
Valves & Lifting Devices :valves, safety valves and reducing valves - crane hooks,
lifting chains, chain blocks, E.O.T.Crane.
UNIT V 11+3
Design criteria for Marine systems:
Water cooling systems for diesel engines and steam plants.
Lubricating oil systems for propulsion and auxiliary engines.
Electro hydraulic steering gear system including rudder, rudderstock, tiller, rams.
Marine Diesel Engine air starting system including air receiver, compressors and air
starting valves.
Marine Diesel Engine Scavenge and Exhaust systems.
Marine diesel Engine fuel injection system including fuel pumps and fuel injectors.
Power transmission system including thrust blocks, intermediate shaft and tail end shaft.
Steam turbine plants.
Gas turbine plants.
L : 45 , T : 15 , TOTAL : 60 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Pandya & Shah, “Machine Design”, 13th Edition, Charotar Publishing House,
Gujarath, 1997.
2. Sam Had Dad, Neil Watson, “Design and Application in Diesel Engines”, 1st Edition,
Ellis Horwood Limited, London, 1984.
3. khurmi,R.S. and Gupta,J.K., “
5
REFERENCES
1. Indian Register of Shipping Part 1 to Part 7, “Rules and Regulations & Classification
of steel ships” 1st Edition, Mumbai, 1999.
2. PSG College of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, ”Design Data”, 2nd
Edition, M/s DPU printer, Coimbatore, 1978.
MV2402 MARINE ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM
The aim of the course is to develop skills of students in Marine Electrical Technology.
The students will be imparted training in handling various electrical instruments to find
out faults on various electrical equipments onboard ships and rectify such faults.
OBJECTIVES
 On completion of the course the students are expected to
 Know the regulations observed onboard ships regarding electrical equipments
wherever applicable.
 Know the use of electrical instruments, to find out and rectify various kinds of
faults onboard ships.
UNIT I POWER DISTRIBUTION AND REGULATIONS 9
The marine environment – effects of inclination – Generators – Power supply commonly
available – main switchboard – motor controls – emergency services – emergency stop
panel – ships auxillary services – load analysis – electrical diagrams – inherent dangers
and avoidance of disastrous consequences – active and passive safety measures – Do’s
and Don’ts – Electric shock – first aid – conditions of shock risk – selection of AC and
DC generators for use on ships – merits and demerits – location and Installation of
generator sets.
Requirements & Regulations – safe electrical equipments for hazardous areas –
American safety standards – common definitions – British and European standards –
tanker installations – Installations Ashore – Indian Standards.
Systems of AC distribution – general concept – single, two and three phase systems
with 2,3 and 4 wires – power distribution – general Distribution scheme – specific
systems for ship’s service – tankers schemes – primary power bus – need for
emergency power supply – method of supply – passenger and cargo vessels
requirements – shore supply –precautions to be taken while consuming shore supply –
arrangement to ensure proper phase supply – remote switches to ventilating fans – fuel
pumps – lubricating oil pumps and purifiers.
UNIT II INSTRUMENTATION AND SWITCHGEAR 9
Insulated & Earthed neutral systems – introduction – circuit faults – causes –prevention
– earth fault indicators – detection and clearance – alternators.
AVR: excitation systems – carbon pile regulator – vibrating contact and static automatic
regulator – transient voltage dip and alternator response – effect of kW and kVAR
Loading.
Panel Instrumentation: Introduction – system terminology – phase sequence indicators.
Paralleling of Alternators: Manual and auto synchronizing – lamps – parallel operation –
excitation and throttle control – load sharing – kW, kVAR and Manual.
6
Switchboards & Switchgear: Main and sub switchboard-Rating and Characteristics of
Main switchboards – group starter boards – distribution Fuse boards – bus bars –
instrumentation & controls – circuit breakers – alternator CB’s – MCCB’s – miniature
CB’s-RCCB’s – arc fault Current Interrupts – fused Isolators – fault protection devices –
introduction – over-voltage-surge-transients – ripple – spikes – DC generator protection
–alternator and system protection – protection through fuses – protection Discrimination
Motor Protection.
UNIT III CABLES AND LIGHTING SYSTEMS 9
Electrical Cables: Cables- conductors – Wire Sizes-Current Rating – testing-codes-
Practical tips.
Insulation – protection and temperature ratings – insulation classes – A, B, E, F,HInsulation
for High temperatures – Insulating Materials – Cable insulation & Sheath –
Formation of polymers, classification, Polymerization mechanisms – filters – Cross –
linking – Cable gland – Degrees of Protection – Temperature Ratings – Temperature
Rise – Determination of hot temperature.
Lighting Systems: Introduction – Incandescent Lamps – Discharge lamps – HCLPMF
lamps – High pressure Mercury Fluorescent lamps – High and Low pressure sodium
vapour lamps – Lamp caps – Effect of voltage on lamp performance – Navigation &
signal lights – Signals for a power driven ship under way (At night) – Emergency lighting
– Requirement of lighting of Deck and pump house of oil tankers. Alarm Indication
Systems: Fire alarms and Detection – Heat detectors – Smoke detectors – Combustion
detectors – Miscellaneous alarm indicator systems – Scanning type system – Sequential
starting and cut outs for an automatic fired boiler incorporating safety devices and
combustion control equipments – incinerators – Sewage plants – Bilge oil separators.
UNIT IV PROPULSION AND STEERING SYSTEMS 9
Propulsion Systems: Auxiliary propulsion systems – Layout and Optimizing storage
space – Electrical Propulsion – Advantages & Disadvantages DC constant current
systems – DC motor supplied from alternators – Turbo – electric propulsion – AC single
speed and Induction motor drives – Fixed speed alternators – Cycloconverter device-
Diesel Electric propulsion – Thruster and Water jet propulsion.
Steering Systems & Gyrocompasses: Fundamentals – Auto Navy steering Systems –
Type P – Electro hydraulic Steering – Control systems-Typical system configuration-
Components-Auto Steer-Types, Structure – Gyroscopes – Compass Considerations.
Deck Machinery & Cargo Equipment: Anchor Windlass – Cargo winches – Hydra lift
Marine cranes-Maritime GMC A.S.-Hagglunds Drives & H.W. Carlsen AB-Magnetic disc
brakes.
Automation of Air Compressors: Selection – Choice of a correct machine-Oil-free
and non-oil free air – Instrument air – Air Vs Water cooled- Reciprocating Compressors-
Starting & control-Safety protection Equipment – Automatic Operation.
UNIT V AUXILLARIES AND MAINTENANCE 9
Batteries & Battery charging: Battery supplies – Lead-acid batteries – Electrical
Characteristics – Nickel – Cadmium batteries – Sealed Ni-Cd batteries – Battery
charging – Charging from AC and DC mains – Standby Emergency batteries – Voltage
Regulators – Battery insulation & safety measures – First Aid treatment – Rotary
generators.
7
Gas analysers: Combustible gas indicator – Portable oxygen analyzer – CO2 Analysis
– Tank scope – Fixed oxygen Analyser. Miscellaneous Systems: Cathodic protection
system-Crankcase oil mist detector – Air drier – Dynic Water purity meter – Salinometer
– Electric Tachometer – Rudder position Indicator – Ship’s roll stabilizer – Galley
Equipment – Laundry Equipment – Refrigerating Machinery – Temperature monitoring
for R & AC systems.
Maintenance & Troubleshooting: Introduction – Planned Preventive Maintenance –
Life, Breakdown and Condition maintenance, Troubleshooting, Maintenance of specific
equipments – Recommended list of spares, tools & Accessories.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. BOWIC C.T., Marine Electrical Practice, 5th Edition, “Butter Worth”, London, 1981.
2. LAW S.W., “Electricity applied to Marine Engineering”, 4th Edition, “The Institute of
Marine Engineers”, London, 1998.
REFERENCES
1. Elstan.A. Fernandez., “Marine Electrical Technology”, 1st Edition, “Sterling Book
House”, Mumbai, 2002.
MV2403 MARINE VEHICLES PERFORMANCE L T P C
2 2 0 3
AIM:
To impart Knowledge to students about Marine Vehicle Performance while sailing
OBJECTIVES:
On Completion of Course the Students are expected to have knowledge about,
 Ships Models and the Sea Trials
 Various types of Propellers and Rudders
 Wave motions and the Ships Vibration s
UNIT I 14
Resistance: Types of resistance, frictional, residuary and total resistance, air,
appendage, wave making, eddy and form resistances, model testing, propeller tests in
open water, admiralty coefficient, fuel coefficient and consumption, sea trials –
Problems.
UNIT II 12
Propeller Theory : types of propellers, apparent slip, real slip, wake, thrust, relation
between powers and relation between mean problem and speed, measurement of pitch,
cavitations, built and solid propellers, interaction between the ship and propeller, hull
efficiency over all propulsive efficiency – problems.
8
UNIT III 10
Rudder theory – types of rudders, model experiments and turning trials, area and
shape of rudder, position of rudder, bow rudders vs stern rudder, forces on rudder,
torque on stock, angle of heel, due to force on rudder and angle of heel when turning –
problems.
UNIT IV 12
Wave theory: Theory of waves, trochoidal waves, relationship between line of orbit
centres and the undisturbed surface, sinusoidal wave, Irregular wave pattern, wave
spectra, wave amplitudes, rolling in unresisting media, rolling in resisting media, practical
aspects of rolling, Anti rolling devices, forces caused by rolling, pitching, heaving and
yawing.
UNIT V 12
Ship vibration & noise : Hull vibration, Engine vibration, vibration of shafting system,
balancing of engine.
L : 45 , T : 15 , TOTAL : 60 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. K.J. Rawson and E.C. Tupper, “Basic Ship Theory” (Vol. II), 5th Edition, Butterworth
Heinemann, London, 2001.
2. Eric C.Tupper, “Introduction to Naval Architecture”, 3rd Edition, Butter worth –
Heinemann, London, 2001.
REFERENCES
1. “Principles of Naval Architecture”,SNAME Publication
2. R. Battaharjee, “Dynamics of Marine vehicles” SNAME Publication
MV2404 MARINE AUXILIARY MACHINERY – II L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge on the Working Principle of Marine Auxiliary Machineries
OBJECTIVES
At The end of the course the students are expected to have the knowledge on
 The Construction, operation, maintenance of incinerator.,and sewage plant.
 The Construction, operation, maintenance of Oily water Seperator and Purifiers
 The Construction operation, maintenance of sewage plant.
UNIT I 9
Operation & Maintenance - Prevention of oil, garbage, sewage, air pollution and IMO
requirement as per MARPOL act. Operation, construction, maintenance of oil water
separator both manual and automatic versions.Construction, operation, maintenance of
incinerator and the of sewage plant.
UNIT II 9
Theory of oil purification - Construction, operation, maintenance of fuel oil and lub oil
purifiers, clarifiers together with self de sludge operation. Theory of air compression and
uses of compressed air on board.
9
Construction, operation, maintenance of main air compress and emergency air
compressors.
Types of bow thrusters, operation, maintenance of the same and Deck machinery,
operation, maintenance of cargo winches, windless mooring winches.
UNIT III 9
Methods of shaft alignment - Construction, operation, maintenance of - thrust block. -
intermediate shaft.
Construction, operation, maintenance stern tube and stern tube bearing both water
cooled and oil cooled together with sealing glands .Stresses in shafting, i.e. intermediate
shaft, thrust shaft and screw shaft.
UNIT IV 9
Dry docking - Preparation and procedure to dry docking vessel. Maintenance of hull,
underwater fittings and machine maintenance and repairs during dry dock Removal and
maintenance of rudder and propeller.
Removal and maintenance of tail shaft and stern tube bearing.
UNIT V 9
Line Systems - Piping diagrams - Drawing and working principle of the line diagram of
– Bilge-Ballast-Fuel oil transfer- Fuel oil Service- . Cooling Water – Lubricating oil –
Compressed Air - Steam Line – Exhaust Gas - Feed Water.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. DW Smith “Marine Auxiliary Machinery”, 6th edition, Butter Worths,London,1987.
2. HDMcGeorge,”MarineAuxiliary Machinery"7thedition, Butter Worths,London,2001.
REFERENCES
1. D.K. Sanyal, “ Principle and practices of Marine Diesel Engine” 2 nd Edition,
Bhandarkar Publication, Mumbai, 1998
2. MARPOL 73/78, IMO Publications , 2001.
3. Wood Yard , Doug, “Pounder”s Marine Diesel Engine” 7thedition, Butter Worths
Heinemann Publications ,London 2001
4. “Pumping and Piping Diagram”, IME publication
MV2405 SHIP’S FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM
To provide knowledge an understanding of advanced Fire Prevention and Control to
the students.
OBJECTIVES
At the end of the course the students will have learnt about,
 Fire protection, Detection and Safety systems in ships.
 Construction, Operation and Maintenance of Fixed and portable Fire
Extinguishers in ships.
 Fire prevention and control in oil tankers – LPG / LNG carriers – Chemical
tankers – oil rigs – supply vessels – Fire fighting ships – operation.
10
UNIT I 9
Fire protection built in Ships: SOLAS convention, requirements in respect of materials
of construction and design of ships, (class A, B, type BHDS), fire detection and
extinction systems, fire test, escape means, electrical installations, ventilation system
and venting system for tankers. Statutory requirements for fire fighting systems and
equipments on different vessels, fire doors & fire zones.
UNIT II 9
Detection and Safety Systems: Fire safety precautions on cargo ships, tankers and
passenger ships during working. Types of detectors, selection of fire detectors and alarm
systems and their operational limits. Commissioning and periodic testing of sensors and
detection system. Description of various systems fitted on ships.
UNIT III 9
Fire Fighting Equipment: Fire pumps, hydrants and hoses, couplings, nozzles and
international shore connection, construction, operation and merits of different types of
portable, non-portable and fixed fire extinguishers installations for ships, properties of
chemicals used, water-mist fire suppression system. Advantages of various fire
extinguishing agents including vaporizing fluids and their suitability for ship’s use. control
of class A,B,C & class D fires, Combustion products & their effects on life safety.
UNIT IV 9
Fire Control: Action required and practical techniques adopted for extinguishing fires in
accommodation, machinery spaces, boiler rooms, cargo holds, galley, etc. Fire fighting
in port and dry dock. Procedure for re-entry after putting off fire, Rescue operations from
affected compartments. First aid, fire organization on ships, shipboard organization for
fire and emergencies. Combustion products and their effects on life safety, fire signal
and muster. Fire drill. Leadership and duties, Fire control plan, human behaviour.
UNIT V 9
Safety Measures - Special safety measures for preventing, fighting fire in tankers,
chemical carriers, oil rigs, supply vessels, and fire fighting ships - Safe working practice
with respect to fire on board ships and first aid for hazards arising from fire in ships.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Frank Rush Brook, “Fire Aboard”, 3rd Edition, Brown, son & ferguson Ltd., Glassgow
1988.
2. E.A. Stokoe, “Reed’s Ship Construction for Marine Students”, Vol.5, 5th edition,
Thomas Reed Publications, Great Britain 1999.
REFERENCES
1. M.G. Stavitsky, V.I. Vostryakov, M.F.Kortunov, V.I. Martynenko & V.M. Sidoryok.,
“Fire Fighting Aboard ships”, Vol. I & Vol. II, Structural Design and Fire Extinguishing
System, 1st edition, published by Gulf publishing company, Houston, London, 1983.
2. D.G. Shipping, Fire Fighting Appliances Rules (1969/1990), 3rd edition published by
Bhandarkar Publications, Mumbai, 1996
3. IMO, SOLAS (Safety of Life At Sea) 3rd Edition, International Maritime Organization,
London, UK, 2001.
4. Leslie Jackson, Reed’s General Engineering Knowledge for Marine Engineers Vol.8,
4th Edition, Thomas Reed publication, Great Britain, 1986.
11
MV2406 FIRE FIGHTING, CONTROLS AND SIMULATOR LABORATORY L T P C
0 0 4 3
MARINE ENGINEERING FIRE FIGHTING LABORATORY 25
1. Fire hazard aboard ships – inflammability, fire extinguishing use. Control of class
A, B & C fires.
Fire protection built in ships, extinction systems, and escape means.
System for tankers, statutory requirements for fire fighting systems and equipments on
different vessels.
Fire fighting equipment: fire pumps, hydrants and hoses, couplings, nozzles and
International shore connection, Construction, Operation and merits of different
types of portable extinguishers.
Non-portable and fixed fire extinguishers, installation for ships. Properties of chemical
used, bulk cabon-di-oxide, and inert gas systems.
Firemen outfit its use and care, maintenance, testing and recharging of appliances,
preparation, and fire appliance survey.
Fire Control: Action required and practical techniques adopted for extinguishing fires in
accommodation, machinery spaces, boiler rooms, Cargo holds, galley etc.,
Fire fighting in port and dry dock. Procedure for re-entry after putting off fire, rescue
operations from affected compartments.
First aid, Fire organisation on ships. Fire signal and muster.
Fire drill.
REFERENCE
Laboratory Manual.
CONTROLS LAB.EXPERIMENTS 15
1. Operation of Automatic Viscosity Controller and maintaining a specific viscosity of a
given fuel.
2. Operation of an Automatic flow controller and measuring the flow from a given pipe.
3. Operation and utility of a 3 Term (P+I+D) Pneumatic controller.
4. To study the functioning of a Mist Detector and checking the alarm when the Pre-set
value is exceeded.
5. Study the operation of fire detection unit using Ionization chamber type detector.
6. CNC & VMC machines, microprocessor controlled DC & AC machines, SCADA.
SIMULATOR LAB. EXPERIMENTS 20
1. Description of basic engine functions and their simulation.
2. Manual Method of operation of engine from engine room station.
3. Engine operation from Remote stations – i.e. engine control room and Navigation
Bridge.
4. Safety and interlocks in UMS – ships and effect of malfunction of main engine
auxiliaries.
5. Electronic logic circuits in remote control stations.
6. Simulation of engine functions in logic circuits.
7. Study and adjustments of Logic circuits for remote control operation of main engine
and troubleshooting.
8. Interfacing Input/output and pneumatic interfacing in the systems.
9. Role of classification societies with reference to UMS – ships.
12
TOTAL : 60 PERIODS
LIST OF EQUIPMENTS
for a batch of 40 students
MARINE FIRE FIGHTING LABORATORY
Sl.No
.
Description of Equipment Qty.
01. Fixed CO2 fire fighting system 01
02. Smoke Detection Unit 01
03. Fire main system 01
04. Fire call point & Gong Bell 01
05. Portable extinguishers (Water, CO2, dry powder, mechanical type
extinguishers)
01
06. Non-Portable Extinguisher – Mechanical Extinguisher 01
07. Smoke & Heat detectors 01
08. C.A.B.A 01
09. Bellow type foot pump 01
10. First aid kit and stretcher 01
MARINE CONTROLS LABORATORY
Sl.No
.
Description of Equipment Qty.
01. Transparent Hydraulic Trainer 01
02. Transparent Pneumatic Trainer 01
03. Electro Hydraulic and Pneumatic Trainer 01
04. PID Trainer – Hydraulic 01
05. PID Trainer – Pneumatic 01
06. PC Interface 01
07. Air Compressor Suitable for above system 01
MARINE SIMULATOR LABORATORY
Sl.No
.
Description of Equipment Qty.
01. Engine Room Simulation Master Panel 01
02. Engine Room Simulation Trainee Panels 04
13
MV2407 MARINE PROPULSION AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY LABORATORY
L T P C
0 0 4 2
MAINE ENGINE 25 HRS
Study of Lubricating oil cooler
Study of Jacket water cooler
Study of Scavenge Air cooler
Study of crank case inspection and bearing clearances
Fuel injection valve and pump
starting air valve
cylinder relief valve and indicator cock
AUXILIARY ENGINE 10 HRS
Study of Turbo charger
Study of Cylinder Head and fittings
Study of Fuel Injection pump
AUXILIARY MACHINES 25 HRS
Study of Lubricating oil screw pump
Study of S.W. Centrifugal pump
Reciprocating Bilge pump
Study of Boiler safety valve and water level gauge glass
Study of 2 RAM hydraulic steering gear
Study of various types of values, filters, oil separators, Incinerator, Heat Exchanger etc.
Study of boilers, cargo oil pump, F.W.Generator.
TOTAL : 60 PERIODS
LIST OF EQUIPMENTS
(for a batch of 40 students)
MARINE PROPULSION LABORATORY
Sl.
No.
Description of Equipment Qty.
01. Fuel Oil Separator 01
02. Lub Oil Separator 01
03. Bilge Pump 01
04. Ballast Pump 130 cu.m/hr. 01
05. Main Engine Sea Water Pump 01
06. Sludge Pump 01
07. Fuel Oil Transfer Pump 01
08. Ballast Pump 65 cu.m /hr. 01
09. Lub Oil Filter 01
10. Fuel Oil Filter 01
11. Lub Oil Cooler 01
12. Sea Water Cooler 01
13. Main Engine 01
14. Air Compressor with bottle 01
15. Main Engine Lub Oil Pump 01
16. Portable Compressor 01
17. Diesel Generator 300 KW / 100 KW 01
14
MARINE AUXILIARY MACHINERY LABORATORY
Sl.
No.
Description of Equipment Qty.
01. Air Compressor 01
02. Heat Exchanger 01
03. Incinerator 01
04. Oily Water Separator 01
05. Steering Gear 01
06. Cargo Turbine Oil Pump 01
07. Cargo Winch 01
08. Governor 01
09. Thermostat 01
10. Crankshaft 01
MARINE DISMANTLING AND ASSEMBLING LABORATORY
Sl.No
.
Description of Equipment Qty.
01. Heleshaw Pump 01
02. Piston Pump 01
03. Centrifugal Pump 01
04. Gear Pump 01
05. Fire & G.S Pump 01
06. Screw Displacement pump 01
07. Sewage Treatment Plant 01
08. Cargo Oil Pump 01
09. Different types of valves (quick closing valve,
non-return valve, butterfly valve)
01
Each
10. Water gauge glass 01
MARINE BOILER WORKSHOP
Sl.No
.
Description Qty.
01. Auxillary Water Tube Boiler 01
02. Fresh Water Generator 01
15
GE2321 COMMUNICATION SKILLS LABORATORY L T P C
(Fifth / Sixth Semester) 0 0 4 2
Globalisation has brought in numerous opportunities for the teeming millions, with more
focus on the students’ overall capability apart from academic competence. Many
students, particularly those from non-English medium schools, find that they are not
preferred due to their inadequacy of communication skills and soft skills, despite
possessing sound knowledge in their subject area along with technical capability.
Keeping in view their pre-employment needs and career requirements, this course on
Communication Skills Laboratory will prepare students to adapt themselves with ease to
the industry environment, thus rendering them as prospective assets to industries. The
course will equip the students with the necessary communication skills that would go a
long way in helping them in their profession.
OBJECTIVES:
 To equip students of engineering and technology with effective speaking and
listening skills in English.
 To help them develop their soft skills and interpersonal skills, which will make the
transition from college to workplace smoother and help them excel in their job.
 To enhance the performance of students at Placement Interviews, Group
Discussions and other recruitment exercises.
A. ENGLISH LANGUAGE LAB (18 Periods)
1. LISTENING COMPREHENSION: (6)
Listening and typing – Listening and sequencing of sentences – Filling in the blanks -
Listening and answering questions.
2. READING COMPREHENSION: (6)
Filling in the blanks - Close exercises – Vocabulary building - Reading and answering
questions.
3. SPEAKING: (6)
Phonetics: Intonation – Ear training - Correct Pronunciation – Sound recognition
exercises – Common Errors in English.
Conversations: Face to Face Conversation – Telephone conversation – Role play
activities (Students take on roles and engage in conversation)
B. DISCUSSION OF AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS (6 PERIODS)
(Samples are available to learn and practice)
I. PC based session (Weightage 40%) 24 periods
16
1. RESUME / REPORT PREPARATION / LETTER WRITING (1)
Structuring the resume / report - Letter writing / Email Communication - Samples.
2. PRESENTATION SKILLS: (1)
Elements of effective presentation – Structure of presentation - Presentation
tools – Voice Modulation – Audience analysis - Body language – Video samples
3. SOFT SKILLS: (2)
Time management – Articulateness – Assertiveness – Psychometrics –
Innovation and Creativity - Stress Management & Poise - Video Samples
4. GROUP DISCUSSION: (1)
Why is GD part of selection process ? - Structure of GD – Moderator – led and
other GDs - Strategies in GD – Team work - Body Language - Mock GD -Video
samples
5. INTERVIEW SKILLS: (1)
Kinds of interviews – Required Key Skills – Corporate culture – Mock interviews-
Video samples.
1. Resume / Report Preparation / Letter writing: Students prepare their (2)
own resume and report.
2. Presentation Skills: Students make presentations on given topics. (8)
3. Group Discussion: Students participate in group discussions. (6)
4. Interview Skills: Students participate in Mock Interviews (8)
REFERENCES:
1. Anderson, P.V, Technical Communication, Thomson Wadsworth, Sixth
Edition, New Delhi, 2007.
2. Prakash, P, Verbal and Non-Verbal Reasoning, Macmillan India Ltd., Second
Edition, New Delhi, 2004.
3. John Seely, The Oxford Guide to Writing and Speaking, Oxford University
Press, New Delhi, 2004.
4. Evans, D, Decisionmaker, Cambridge University Press, 1997.
II. Practice Session (Weightage – 60%) 24 periods
17
5. Thorpe, E, and Thorpe, S, Objective English, Pearson Education,
Second Edition, New Delhi, 2007.
6. Turton, N.D and Heaton, J.B, Dictionary of Common Errors, Addison Wesley
Longman Ltd., Indian reprint 1998.
LAB REQUIREMENTS:
1. Teacher console and systems for students.
2. English Language Lab Software
3. Career Lab Software
Requirement for a batch of 60 students
Sl.No. Description of Equipment Quantity
required
Server
o PIV system
o 1 GB RAM / 40 GB HDD
o OS: Win 2000 server
o Audio card with headphones (with
mike)
1.
o JRE 1.3
1 No.
Client Systems
o PIII or above
o 256 or 512 MB RAM / 40 GB
HDD
o OS: Win 2000
o Audio card with headphones (with
mike)
2.
o JRE 1.3
60 No.
3. Handicam Video Camera (with video
lights and mic input) 1 No.
4. Television - 29” 1 No.
5. Collar mike 1 No.
6. Cordless mikes 1 No.
7. Audio Mixer 1 No.
8. DVD Recorder / Player 1 No.
9. LCD Projector with MP3 /CD /DVD provision
for audio / video facility - Desirable 1 No.
18
GE 2211 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I COMPONENTS OF ENVIRONMENT 9
Components – Water, air and land – Inter-relationship between components –
Subcomponents; Ecosystem – Structure and functional components of ecosystem –
Development and evolution of ecosystem – Energy flow and material cycling in
ecosystem – Natural and man made impacts on water, air and land; Environment and
development – Concept of sustainable development.
UNIT II SCIENCE OF ENVIRONMENT 9
Chemistry, Physics and biology of water, air and land; Stress on the Chemistry, Physics
and Biology of water, air and land owing to the impacts; Environmental quality objective
and goles – policies on development projects and their impacts, with emphasis on the
branch of engineering of the student.
UNIT III CURRENT ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES 9
Current Environmental issues at country level – management of municipal sewage,
municipal solid waste, Hazardous waste and Bio-medical waste – Air pollution due to
industries and vehicles; Global issues – Biodiversity, Climate change, Ozone layer
depletion.
UNIT IV ENGINEERING INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE THE ENVIRONMENTAL
STRESSES 9
Minimisation of Stress – Principles of Physics, chemistry and biology in engineering
interventions such as waste treatment – Flow sheets of engineering interventions
relevant to the Engineering discipline of the student – Waste minimization techniques –
Clean technology options – Standards of performance of the interventions.
UNIT V
(A) TOOLS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 9
Environmental impact assessment; Precautionary Principle and Polluter Pays Principle;
Constitutional provisions, Legal and economic instruments in Environmental
Management; Role of Non-government organisations – Community participation
environmental management works; International conventions and protocols; Pollution
Control Boards and Pollution Control Acts.
(B) FIELD STUDY
In-depth study of environmental issues at least one environmentally sensitive site
relevant to the discipline of the student and preparation of a report thereupon.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. G.M. Master, “Introduction to Environmental Engineering & Science”, Prentice Hall,
New Delhi, 1997.
2. J.G. Henry and G.W. Heike, “Environmental Science & Engineering”, Prentice Hall
International Inc., New Jersy, 1996.
REFERENCES:
1. S.K. Dhameja, Environmental Engineering and Management, S. K. Kataria and Sons,
New Delhi, 1999.
2. State of India’s Environment – A Citizen’s Report, Centre for Science and
Environment and others, 1999.
3. Shyam Divan and Armin Rosancranz, Environmental Law and Policy in India, Cases,
Materials and Statutes, Oxford University Press, 2001.
19
MV2451 SHIP OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMO REGULATIONS L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM
To teach the students about management of ships and impart knowledge on
statutory regulations.
OBJECTIVES
At the end of the course the students would have learnt about,
Structure and functioning of a shipping company.
Planning and estimating of a voyage besides executing the same.
Marine Insurance as applicable to ship, cargo and crew.
Statutory regulations applicable to shipping industry.
Manning of ships, STCW and Port state control.
UNIT I 9
Structure of a shipping company: Structure of a shipping company and functioning of
its various departments, financing, economics of new and second hand tonnage,
subsidies, ownership of vessels, registration of ships, flags of convenience, IMO
identification number.
UNIT II 9
Commercial shipping practice: Planning sailing schedules and voyage estimates, liner
and tramp shipping services, conference systems, chartering and charter parties, ship’s
papers for arrival and departure, port procedures, role of agents, theory of freight rates,
bills of lading, pilotage, cargo surveys and note of protests, carriage of goods by sea act.
UNIT III 9
Marine Insurance: Underwriting and loss adjusting principles applied to Marine cargo
insurance, hull / machinery policy, particular average, general average, P & I Clubs –
making claims.
UNIT IV 9
Statutory Regulations: IMO Conventions, legislations, MARPOL acts and conventions,
annexes I to VI, SOLAS 1974 and amendments, main objectives, overview of all
chapters and articles with an emphasis on ISM and ISPS codes, OPA 90, ballast water
management.
UNIT V 9
STCW: International convention on STCW for seafarers 1978 with 1995 amendments,
an overview of all sections, manning of ships, engagement and discharge of ship’s crew,
ship’s articles, Merchant shipping act, Port state control, PSC mandatory certificate
check list, grounds for PSC inspection criteria for detention, case studies.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. E.F. Stevens & C.S.J. Butterfield “Shipping Practice” 11th Edition, Sterling Book
House, Mumbai, 1999.
2. John.M.Downard, “Ship Management Series - Managing Ships”, I Edition, Fairplay
Publications, Coulsdon, Surrey - 1990.
3. Capt.Dara E.Driver, “Advanced Shipboard Management”, I Edition, Rumar
Publications, Mumbai, 1985.
20
REFERENCES
1. Nilima, M.Chanidiramani, “Carriage of goods by Sea and Multimodal Transport”, 1st
Edition, Saptarang Publication, Mumbai, 1996.
2. SOLAS – 1974 - International Maritime Organisation Publications
3. MARPOL – 1973/78 - International Maritime Organisation Publications
4. STCW -1978/95 - International Maritime Organisation Publications
5. G.Raghuram, “Shipping Management”, 1st Edition, Vasant J.Sheth Memorial
Foundation, Delhi, 1992
6. Merchant Shipping Act, Govt. of India - 1958.
MV2452 MARINE CONTROL ENGINEERING AND AUTOMATION L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM To provide knowledge about Automation and Control Engineering in ships.
OBJECTIVES
At the end of the course the students would have learnt,
Introduction of control systems.
Graphical representation of signals.
Electrical, Electronics, Pneumatic and Hydraulic control systems.
Application of controls in ships.
UNIT I 9
Control system: Introduction to control terms, Block diagrams for control systems,
Block diagram reduction, open loop and closed feed back control, comparison of closed
and open loop, feed forward control. Feed forward modification. Regulators, Proportional
plus integral plus derivative controls. Use of various control modes.
Mathematical Model : Developing Mathematical Models For Mechanical, Hydraulic,
Pneumatic, Thermal, Electrical and Electro mechanical Systems
UNIT II 9
Graphical representation of signals: Inputs of step, Ramp, Sinusoid, Pulse and
Impulse, Exponential Function etc Error Detector, Controller output elements. Dynamics
of a simple servomechanism for Angular position Control: Torque Proportional to error,
Different responses of servomechanism. Frequency response test. Series compensation
using Nyquist Diagram
UNIT III 9
Process control systems: Automatic closed loop process. Control system Dynamic
characteristics of processes. Dynamic characteristics of controllers. Electronic
Instrumentation for measurement and control analog computing and simulation:
Introduction, Basic concepts. Analog computers. Simulation. The use of Digital computer
in the simulation of control system. Hybrid computers.
UNIT IV 9
Transmission: Pneumatic and electric transmission, suitability for marine use.
Pneumatic and types of controllers hydraulic, electric and electronic controllers for
generation of control action Time function controllers. Correcting Units: Diaphragm
actuators, Valve positioners, piston actuators, and Electro pneumatic transducers.
Electro- hydraulic actuators and Electric actuator control valves.
21
UNIT V 9
Application of controls on ships: Marine Boiler - Automatic Combustion control, Air -
Fuel ratio control, feed water control single, two and three-element type, steam pressure
control. Combustion chamber pressure control, fuel oil temperature control, Control in
Main Machinery units for temperature of lubricating oil, jacket cooling water, fuel valve
cooling water, piston cooling water and scavenge air, fuel oil viscosity control. Bridge
control of main machinery, Instruments for UMS classification.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. D.A. Taylor, “Marine Control Practice”, 2nd Edition, Butter worth & Co (Publishers)
Ltd., London, 1987.
2. Leslie Jackson, “Instrumentation and Control Systems”, 3rd Edition, Thomas Reed
Publication Ltd., London, 1992.
REFERENCES
1. L.F. Adams, “Engineering Instrumentation and Control”, 1st Edition, English
Language Book Society (ELBS), Hodder, Stoughton, Great Britain, 1984.
2. Peter Harriott, “ Process Control”, 26th reprint, Tata Mc Graw Hill Publishing
Co.Ltd.,2005
MV2453 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS AND WATCH KEEPING L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM
To impart knowledge to the students in Watch-keeping of Engine Room in various types
of ships and to prepare for Class IV MOT Examinations
OBJECTIVES
At the end of the course the students are expected to have learnt,
STCW standards of training, requirements of officers and ratings.
Watch-keeping in various ships.
Prevention, rectification and maintenance with respect to trouble shooting of machineries
in the Engine Room.
UNIT I 9
SAFE WATCH KEEPING:
Definition of watch, operating principles, requirements of watch keeping, requirements of
certification, duties of engineer officers – operation of engine room in general, log book
writing – watch keeping under way – watch keeping at port – at unsheltered anchorage,
fitness for duty, preparation of Diesel Engines for a long voyage – bad weather
precautions, safe working practices – during overhauling at port, and during bad
weather, change over from diesel oil to heavy oil and vice versa.
Trouble shooting during watch keeping: Emergency measures taken in case of –
flooding of engine room, engine room bilge fire, general fire, Incase of any system failure
or breakage of pipe lines, etc.
22
UNIT II 9
Trouble shooting in Auxiliary Machineries:
Malfunctioning, partial or total failure of auxiliary machineries – such as, auxiliary
engines, purifiers, heat exchangers, air compressors, reefer and air conditioning
compressors and systems, boilers and accessories, fresh water generators, hydrophore
tanks and systems, all pumps & systems.
Repairs and maintenance of propeller, rudder, drydocking methods, drydocking
inspection and repair works.
UNIT III 9
Trouble shooting in Main Engine:
Trouble shooting related to various types of marine diesel engines and condition
monitoring – causes, effects, remedies and prevention of engine not turning on Air and
Fuel, knocking at TDC and BDC, black smoke in funnel, poor compression and
combustion, early or advanced injection, turbocharger surging, scavenge fire, Air starting
line explosion, crank case explosion, exhaust uptake fire, failure of bottom end bolts.
UNIT IV 9
Maintenance of Engine components :
Checking of holding down bolts, resin chocking – Tie-rods tensioning, checking and
tightening of 2-stroke and 4-stroke bottom end bolts.
Inspection and maintenance of crankshaft and cam shaft, dismantle inspection and
reassemble of main bearings, cross head bearings & bottom end bearings, connecting
rod, piston and piston assembly, stuffing box, cylinder head and all mountings, governor
and over speed trip – checking of all clearances, adjustments, effect of improper
clearances, prevention and rectification.
Cylinder liner and cylinder lubrication, thrust bearing, running gears inspection, engine
alignment, chains drive adjustment and tensioning.
UNIT V 9
Trouble shooting and maintenance of electrical machineries:
Circuit testing, shore supply arrangement, maintenance of circuit breakers, transformers,
electrical motors, navigational lights, batteries, starters, electrical equipments,
maintenance of switchboard.
Maintenance of electrical equipments in oil tankers, LNG / LPG carriers.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Vikram Gokhale & N.Nanda,” Marine Engineering Practice and Ship safety and
Environmental protection”, 3rd Edition, Engee Enterprises Mumbai, 2002.
2. Sulzer brothers, “Sumitomo – Sulzer Diesel Engines”, Service Instruction for
Sumitomo Sulzer Diesel Engines RND Sumitomo ship building & Machining co., Ltd.,
Japan.
REFERENCES
1. IME Manuals and Ship’s Marine Manuals.
2. Manual instruction for MAN Diesel Engine and spare parts, 1968.
3. Instruction Manual for Mitsui – B & W Diesel Engine data, Mitsui Engineering & Ship
Building co., Mitsui B & W, 1976.
4. Manual De Maintenance & operation MAN type K.270 120E DMR.
5. Daihatsu Diesel Engine instruction book, Operation & maintenance manual for
Daihatsu Diesel Engine Model – DV26, Model 6 PKT – TB-16.
23
MV 2454 COMPREHENSION TEST L T P C
0 0 2 1
Syllabus: Diesel Engines, Marine Auxiliary machineries, controls, Naval Architecture
and Marine electrical machineries.
After completion of 4 years training, the Marine Engineering students will be tested on
the Marine Engineering knowledge acquired by way of comprehension test. Valuation is
done by both Internal and External Examiners for 100 Marks.
MV2455 PROJECT WORK, TECHNICAL PAPER AND VIVA VOCE L T P C
0 0 12 6
It is mandatory on the part of the students to do a project and submit a report containing
not more than 100 pages. A project should be undertaken by not exceeding 4 students
in a batch.
The project can be of working model, PC based training module and theoretical design
and analysis. This will be evaluated by both Internal and External Examiners.
The projects will be done in the eighth semester and will be reviewed three times by
project guide and HOD. The internal mark of 100, for this, will be allotted by the guide.
The thesis work will be evaluated by both Internal and External Examiners for a
maximum of 100 Marks.
GE2022 TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9
Introduction - Need for quality - Evolution of quality - Definition of quality - Dimensions of
manufacturing and service quality - Basic concepts of TQM - Definition of TQM – TQM
Framework - Contributions of Deming, Juran and Crosby – Barriers to TQM.
UNIT II TQM PRINCIPLES 9
Leadership – Strategic quality planning, Quality statements - Customer focus –
Customer orientation, Customer satisfaction, Customer complaints, Customer retention -
Employee involvement – Motivation, Empowerment, Team and Teamwork, Recognition
and Reward, Performance appraisal - Continuous process improvement – PDSA cycle,
5s, Kaizen - Supplier partnership – Partnering, Supplier selection, Supplier Rating.
UNIT III TQM TOOLS & TECHNIQUES I 9
The seven traditional tools of quality – New management tools – Six-sigma: Concepts,
methodology, applications to manufacturing, service sector including IT – Bench marking
– Reason to bench mark, Bench marking process – FMEA – Stages, Types.
24
UNIT IV TQM TOOLS & TECHNIQUES II 9
Quality circles – Quality Function Deployment (QFD) – Taguchi quality loss function –
TPM – Concepts, improvement needs – Cost of Quality – Performance measures.
UNIT V QUALITY SYSTEMS 9
Need for ISO 9000- ISO 9000-2000 Quality System – Elements, Documentation, Quality
auditing- QS 9000 – ISO 14000 – Concepts, Requirements and Benefits – Case studies
of TQM implementation in manufacturing and service sectors including IT.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Dale H.Besterfiled, et at., “Total Quality Management”, Pearson Education Asia, 3rd
Edition, Indian Reprint (2006).
REFERENCES:
1. James R. Evans and William M. Lindsay, “The Management and Control of Quality”,
6th Edition, South-Western (Thomson Learning), 2005.
2. Oakland, J.S., “TQM – Text with Cases”, Butterworth – Heinemann Ltd., Oxford, 3rd
Edition, 2003.
3. Suganthi,L and Anand Samuel, “Total Quality Management”, Prentice Hall (India)
Pvt. Ltd.,2006.
4. Janakiraman, B and Gopal, R.K, “Total Quality Management – Text and Cases”,
Prentice Hall (India) Pvt. Ltd., 2006.
GE2021 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS IN ENGINEERING L T P C
3 0 0 3
UNIT I ENGINEERING ETHICS 9
Senses of ‘Engineering Ethics’ – variety of moral issues – types of inquiry – moral
dilemmas – moral autonomy – kohlberg’s theory – giligan’s theory – consensus and
controversy – professions and professionalism – professional ideals and virtues –
theories about right action – self-interest – customs and religion – uses of ethical
theories.
UNIT II ENGINEERING AS SOCIAL EXPERIMENTATION 9
Engineering as experimentation – engineers as responsible experimenters – codes of
ethics – a balanced outlook on law-the challenger case study.
UNIT III ENGINEER’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR SAFETY 9
Safety and risk – assessment of stafety and risk – risk benefit analysis-reducing risk-the
three mile island and case studies.
UNIT IV RESPONSIBILITIES AND RIGHTS 9
Collegiality and loyalty – respect for authority – collective bargaining – confidentiality –
conflicts of interest – occupational crime – professional rights – employee rights –
intellectual property rights (ipr) – discrimination.
25
UNIT V GLOBAL ISSUES 9
Multinational corporations – environmental ethics – computer ethics – weapons
development – engineers as managers – consulting engineers – engineers as expert
witnesses and advisors – moral leadership – sample code of conduct
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Mike Martin and Roland Schinzinger, “Ethics in Engineering”, McGraw Hill, New
Year 1996.
REFERENCES:
1. Charless D. Fleddermann, “Engineering Ethics”, prentice Hall, New Mexico, 1999.
2. Laura Schlesinger, “How Could You Do That: The Abdication and Character,
Courage and Conscience”, Harper Collins, New York, 1996.
3. Stephen Carter, “Integrity”, Basic Books, New York, 1996.
4. Tom Rusk, “The Power of Ethical Persuasion: From Conflict to Partnership at Work
and in Private Life”, Viking, New York, 1993.
MV2020 DOUBLE HULL TANKERS L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge on the design features and utility of Double Hull Tankers
OBJECTIVES
On completion of the course the students are expected to have the knowledge on the
 Advantages and superiority of double hull tankers
 Design Consideration and Storage of Oil Space
 Structural design of double hull and oil handling devices
 Economic Aspect of Double Hull tankers
UNIT I 9
Introduction - Origin of double hull ships, their usefulness and superiority over
conventional single skin ships, use of double hull tank ships for transport of different
types of commodities, prevention of oil-spill and pollution of sea, IMO requirements,
schedule for phasing out single hull tank vessels of different sizes.
UNIT II 9
Design - main dimension, hull-weight estimate, double hull requirements, minimum
depth of double bottom tank, wing tank width, clearance for inspection etc. maximum
cargo tank size, capacity, effect of free surface, damage stability, hydrostatically
balanced loading, sloshing loads, its elimination or minimization.
UNIT III 9
Structural Analysis - non-uniform and uniform stress distribution, unidirectional
(longitudinal) structural members, elimination of transverse structural members (except
transverse bulkheads), minimization of structural discontinuities and stress concentration
zones, use of steel of higher strength, resistance to grounding and collision,
classification society requirements, access to inside and bottom spaces.
26
UNIT IV 9
Cargo handling system - use of submerged pumps, ordinary pumps of new
independent pumps, cargo transfer system, assurance of quality of cargo oil, complete
elimination of risk of admixture of different grades of oil, concealed pipelines, easy
maintenance, inspection and cleaning, elimination of explosion risks.
UNIT V 9
Economical Operations - Economical aspects, fast loading discharging or oil cargo,
quicker cleaning, ballasting and de-ballasting, larger number of trips per year.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS
1. Indian Register of Shipping Notes on Design of Double Hull Tankers
2. Lloyd Register of Shipping Notes on Design of Double Hull Tankers
3. “Ship Design”, SNAME
MV2021 MARITIME ECONOMICS & INSURANCE L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM: To understand the principles of Maritime Economics.
OBJECTIVES:
1. Learn about various shipping markets.
2. Learn about freight rates and financing of ships.
3. Understand Maritime trade and Economics of bulk shipping.
4. Understand General Cargo shipping and Regulating Maritime trade.
5. Understand Forecasting and Market Research in shipping.
UNIT I 9
Shipping Market
The Economic Organization of the Shipping market. The shipping market cycles.
The four shipping markets
UNIT II 9
Supply and Demand , Financing
Supply, demand and freight rates .Costs, revenue and financial performance
Financing ships and shipping companies
UNIT III 9
Trade and Cargo
The economic principles of maritime trade. The global pattern of maritime trade
Bulk cargo and the economics of bulk shipping
UNIT IV 9
Economics of Ships and Fore casting
The general cargo and the economics of liner shipping. The economics of ships and ship
designs
The regulatory framework of maritime economics. The economics of shipbuilding and
scrapping
Maritime forecasting and market research.
27
UNIT V 9
Law and Marine Insurance:
Information about law, Maritime Law. Marine Insurance, Clauses, General Average
Franchise, Maritime perils, Protection and Indemnity Association, Warranties.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Martin Stopford, “Maritime Economics”, 2nd Edition, Routledge, London, 1997.
2. Dr. K.V. Hariharan, “Containerisation & Multimodal Transport in India”, 2nd Edition,
Shroff Publishers & Distributors Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai,1997.
3. F. N. Hepkins “Business Law for the Ship Master”.
4. J.Bes “Chartering & Shipping Terms”.
REFERENCES:
1. G. Raghuram & others, “Shipping Management Cases and Concepts”, 1st Edition,
MacMillan India Ltd., Mumbai, 1998.
2. J.S. Gill, “Manual of Merchant Shipping Act, 1958, “1st Edition, Bhandarkar
Publications, Mumbai, 1999.
3. E.R. Hardy Ivamy,” Casebook on Shipping Law”, 4th Edition, Lloyd’s of London Press
Ltd., London, 1987.
MV2022 MARINE PROPELLERS AND PROPULSION L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge on the Propeller, Geometry, Design, Performance and defects
OBJECTIVES
On completion of the course the students are expected to have the knowledge on the
 Various types of Propulsion systems, Propeller geometry
 Propeller theory , propeller operating environment
 Interaction between hull and the propeller
 Performance and maintenance of proppellers
UNIT I 9
Propulsion Systems and Propeller Geometry.
Fixed pitch propellers, Ducted propellers, Podded and azimuthing propulsors, Contrarotating
propellers, Overlapping propellers, Tandem propellers, Controllable pitch
propellers, Waterjet propulsion, Cycloidal propellers paddle wheels, Magnetohydrodynamic
propulsion, Superconducting motors for marine propulsion.
Frames of references, Propeller reference lines, Pitch, Rake and skew, Propeller
outlines and area, Propeller drawing methods Section geometry and definition, Blade
thickness distribution and thickness fraction, Blade interference limits for controllable
pitch propellers, Controllable pitch propeller off-design section geometry, Miscellaneous
conventional propeller geometry terminology.
28
UNIT II 9
Propeller Environment & performance characteristics.
Density of water, Salinity, Water temperature, Viscosity, Vapour pressure, Dissolved
gases in sea water, Surface tension, Weather, Silt and marine organisms.
UNIT III 9
Propeller theory, Cavitation & noise.
Momentum theory – Ranking, R.E. Froude , Blade element theory – W. Froude ,
Propeller Theoretical development, Burrill’s analysis procedure, Lerbs analysis method,
Eckhardt and Morgan’s design method, Lifting surface correction factors – Morgan,
Lifting surface models, Lifting-line – lifting-surface hybrid models, Vortex lattice methods,
Boundary element methods, Methods for specialist propulsors, Computational fluid
dynamics methods.
The basic physics of cavitation, Types of cavitation experienced by propellers, Cavitation
considerations in design, Cavitation inception, Cavitation-induced damage, Cavitation
testing of propellers, Analysis of measured pressure data from a cavitating propeller,
Propeller – rudder interaction.
Physics of underwater sound, Nature of propeller noise, Noise scaling relationships,
Noise prediction and control, Transverse propulsion unit noise, Measurement of radiated
noise.
UNIT IV 9
Propeller-ship interaction, Ship resistance and Propulsion:
Bearing forces, Hydrodynamic interaction, Froude’s analysis procedure, Components of
calm water resistance, Methods of resistance evaluation, Propulsive coefficients, The
influence of rough water, Restricted water effects, High-speed hull form resistance, Air
resistance.
UNIT V 9
Service performance, tolerance and maintenance.
Effects of weather, Hull roughness and fouling, Hull drag reduction, Propeller roughness
and fouling, Generalized equations for the roughness-induced power penalties in ship
operation, Monitoring of ship performance.
Propeller tolerances, Propeller inspection, Causes of propeller damage, Propeller repair,
Welding and the extent of weld repairs, stress relief
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK
1. John Carlton, Marine Propellers and Propulsion, (2nd Edition) published by Elservier
limited, 2007,
MV2023 ADVANCED MARINE HEAT ENGINES L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:To impart the knowledge of Latest Designed Marine Heat Engines
OBJECTIVES
On completion of this course the students are expected to have the
 Knowledge on the co- generation plant engines
 Design concept of Turbo blowers and compressors
 Design Concept of Heat Exchangers
 Recent trends in the design changes of IC Engines and Propulsion engines
29
UNIT I COMPLEX HEAT ENGINE PLANTS 9
Combined Steam Turbine and Diesel Engine Cycles. Combined steam Turbine and Gas
Turbine cycles. Combined Gas Turbine and Diesel Engine cycles/Plants. Methods of
improving the overall thermal efficiency of the entire plant. Cascade Refrigeration
plants. Free piston Gas Generators.
UNIT II COMBUSTION AND FLAME STABILISATION 9
Combustion of liquid fuels, atomisation, mixing, combustion curve and different methods
of flame stabilisation, design and combustion chamber. Spray of fuel. Pre-mixing of
gaseous fuels for combustion. Stability of the flame.
UNIT III TURBO BLOWERS AND TURBO COMPRESSORS 9
Compressor characteristics for axial flow compressors and centrifugal compressors.
Stalling of compressors. Turbine characteristics. Matching of components like
compressor and turbine. Performance of different units in combination in single shaft
arrangement. Variable Geometry turbo charges.
UNIT IV HEAT EXCHANGER 9
Types – construction – design – applications.
UNIT V RECENT TRENDS 9
Diesel Engines using LNG vapour camless intelligent Engines , CRDI, NOX and SOX
control by various types – Exhaust gas recirculation – water injection selective cat
reduction – Emission variable injection timing.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Reed”s Marine Engineering Series, “Heat and Heat Engines”, Thomas Reed
Publications Ltd., 1983
MV2024 SUPERCHARGING AND SCAVENGING IN MARINE
DIESEL ENGINES L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge on the Principle , Method and Design of Super charger and
Scavenging devices
OBJECTIVES
On completion of the course the students are expected to have a knowledge on
 Selection of type of super chargers
 Method of Super charging and Scavenging
 Design of Port and Mufflers
 How to improve the performance of these systems
UNIT I 9
Super charging principles: Objectives, thermodynamic consideration of the
mechanical super charging and turbo charging.
30
UNIT II 9
Superchargers: Types of compressors, positive displacement blowers, centrifugal
compressors, characteristics, and suitability for engine application, Phenomena of
surging in centrifugal compressors, matching.
UNIT III 9
Scavenging of two stroke engine: Peculiarities of 2S cycle engines, clarification,
mixture control through port versus read value induction, charging process in a two
stroke cycle engine, terminology, relation between scavenging terms, concepts of
perfect mixing and perfect scavenging.
UNIT IV 9
Ports and muffler design : Porting, design considerations, and intake and exhaust
systems turning.
UNIT V 9
Experimental Methods: Kadenacy System, experimental methods, and disadvantages
of two stroke petrol engines – steps to overcome – orbital engine combustion system,
sonic system.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Supercharging the I.C. Engines – Vincent.
2. Turbocharging the I.C. Engine-Watsun & Junota.
REFERENCE:
1. Scavenging of two stroke cycle diesel engines – Schweitzer.
MV2025 SHIP SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM: To ensure awareness regarding Environmental Protection at Sea and impart
commitment.
OBJECTIVES:
 Learn precautions required for oil tanker operations.
 Learn about MARPOL 73/78 requirements and Safe Working Practices.
 Learn Life Saving and Survival at Sea techniques.
 Learn about IMO, its conventions and statutory certificates of ships.
 To understand Personnel Management, Training and Emergency drills of ships
UNIT I 9
Oil pollution prevention : Pollution of the Marine environment while bunkering,
loading/discharging oil cargo – tank cleaning – pumping out bilges etc., - knowledge of
construction and operation of oil pollution prevention equipment in engine room and on
tankers.
UNIT II 9
Legislations : MARPOL 73/78 and other country legislations like OPA-90 MARPOL
equipment – Knowledge of Codes of Safety Working practices as published –
Knowledge of type of information issued by D.G. Shipping with regard to safety at sea &
safe working practices.
31
UNIT III 9
Survival techniques and life saving appliances on ship: Introduction and safety –
Emergency situations – Principles of survival – Use of survival equipment – Survival
craft and rescue boat – Methods of helicopter rescue – Launching arrangements –
Lifeboat engine and accessories – Evacuation – Signalling equipment and pyrotechnics
– First aid – Radio equipment – Launching and handling survival craft in rough weather –
Understand practical applications of medical guides – Understand process of radio
medical advice – Demonstrate knowledge of actions to be taken in case of accidents or
illnesses that are likely to occur on board ships.
UNIT IV 9
Rules & Regulations : IMO & its conventions – Indian Merchant Shipping Act & Rules –
Classification society – Charterers – Personal relationship onboard ship.
Knowledge of the appropriate statutes of concern to marine engineer officers: The
administrative duties of a Chief Engineer – the organisation and training of staff for both
normal and emergency duties.
The various statutory certificates and documents to be carried onboard ships by all
ships: Dangerous goods codes– Carrying more than 2000 tonnes of oil – Chemical
tankers and Gas carriers.
UNIT V 9
Personnel Management: Principles of controlling subordinates and maintaining good
relationship – staff attitudes – Exercise of authority – Group behaviour – Conditions of
employment.
Organisation of Staff: Manning arrangements – Analysis of work – Allocation of staff –
Organisation of safety and emergencies, staff duties, maintenances, Ship’s records,
communication on the ship, meeting techniques.
Training on board ships: Training methods – Training in safety – Emergency drills –
Training in ship operations.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. STCW – 1995 Hand Book
REFERENCES:
1. Bhandarkar V.K. “MS & M Notices”, 1st Edition, Bhandarkar Publishers, Mumbai,
1998.
2. International Maritime Organisation, “SOLAS consolidated Edition 1997”, 2nd Edition,
Sterling Book House, Mumbai, 1997.
3. International Maritime Organisation, “MARPOL 73/78 consolidated edition 1997”, 2nd
Edition, Sterling Book House, Mumbai, 1997.
4. R. H. B. Sturt, “The Collision Regulations”, 2nd Edition, Lloyd’s of London Press
Ltd., London, 1984.
32
MV2026 SHIP RECYCLING L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge on the Ship Recycling
OBJECTIVES
On completion of the course the students are expected to have the knowledge on the
 Method of preparation and breaking of the Ships
 Hazards involved in while breaking the ships Method of controlling the same
 Types of Recycling and designing the ships Regulations in force for Recycling
 Ship Breaking Yards in INDIA
UNIT I 9
Ship Breaking Methods: Introduction on ship breaking, ‘Afloat method’, Dry dock
method, type of components to be removed. Towing – Beaching – Preparation of
diagram combustible and non-combustible - re usable materials and components,
recovering metals, which are mixed with non-metal – metal cutting and scraping.
UNIT II 9
Ship Breaking safe practices: Objective – definition of enclosed space – assessment
of risk – authorisation – authorisation of entry – precautions – testing of atmosphere
known unsafe space – additional precautions – hazardous cargo – fumigation – example
of an enclosed space entry permit – potentially hazardous materials – hazardous wastes
and substances.
UNIT III 9
Ship Recycling Downstream: Define recyclable –recycled content, recycling plan,
pollution prevention procedure for existing ships – Green passport – minimising reducing
waste generation, for new ships – minimising hazardous substance, designing
recyclable ships – minimising waste generation.
UNIT IV 9
Regulation on recycling: MEPC 53, MEPC 54, MEPC 55, Basel convention, Role of
Flag State, Port State recycling state – ILO, London Convention 1972/ 1996 Protocol,
Shipping Industry. Ship recycling industry, interested stakeholder, and operational safety
hazard conventions, recommended code of practice.
UNIT V 9
Ship breaking Industry: Ship breaking industry in India, present scenario, Gujarat
Maritime Board, Gujarat Enviro protection and Infrastructure Ltd. Growth of Ship
breaking industry – Alang Ship Breaking Yard – Role of pollution control board – Alang –
Sosiya Ship breaking yard, Valanar Ship breaking yard. Hazards associated with ship
breaking metallurgical & engineering consultant(India) finding.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Misra Dr.P., Ship Recycling, 1st Edition, Nanosa Publishers 2007.
2. IMO Guidelines on ship recycling
33
MV2027 MARINE CORROSION AND PREVENTION L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge on the Type of corrosion and how this is being controlled in
marine environment
OBJECTIVES
On completion of the course the students are expected to have the knowledge on the
 Causes of corrosion
 Method of prevention during operation and during construction
 Anti-corrosive paints
 Corrosion in BOILERS and IC ENGINES
UNIT I 9
Introduction – Cathodic Protection – Sacrificial anodes protection – Impressed current
system protection – Bimetallic corrosion – Design faults causing corrosion – corrosion of
metals in sea water, metallic corrosion .
UNIT II 9
Hull Plate Preparation - Plate preparation during building and repair periods -
Atmospheric corrosion Mill scale – flame cleaning – Acid Pickling – Blast cleaning –
causes of paint failure – shipboard preparations for painting – power wire brushing –
power discing – air hammer – high pressure water blasting – sand blasting shot blasting.
UNIT III 9
Modern paint types -Basic composition of paint Albyd – bitumen or pitch – chlorinated
rubber – coaltar epoxy – Epoxy – oleoresinous – phenolic – polyurethane – primers –
vinyl – self polrshing copolymers – shipboard paint systems – underwater AF paints –
boot top anti corrosive paints – super structure paints.
UNIT IV 9
Corrosion in boiler : Atoms & Ions, Ph value eletrochmical corrosion, Direct chemical
attack – Electro chemical attack – reason – remedial measures. Effect of salts & Grease
in feed water. Effect of corrosion while boiler not in service – preservation to avoid
corrosion.
Corrosion in Marine Diesel Engines:
Corrosive wear of cylinder liners – Reasons and remedies – corrosion of Main Engine
Jacket cooling spaces – Reasons and remedies – corrosion in bearings.
UNIT V 9
Corrosion and its prevention: Mechanism of corrosion – Chemical corrosion – Electro
chemical corrosion – Anomic & cathodic protection – forms of metallic coatings –
anodizing – phosphating.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOK:
1. Shipboard operations by H.I. Lavery
34
MV2028 SPECIAL DUTY VESSELS AND TYPE OF OPERATION L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge to the students about special duty ships operation and
classification society regulations.
OBJECTIVE:
After the completion of the course the students will have learnt
 History of trade of special duty vessels.
 Cargo Operations of Oil tankers.
 About Inert Gas Systems and Tank Washing Operations of Tankers.
 Cargo Operations of Chemical tankers, LPG / LNG vessels.
 About rules of classification societies for Cargo Ships and Tankers.
UNIT I 9
Introduction - Need for special duty vessels with reference to development of trade and
necessities of the trade. Operation of Bulk carriers – Bulk Grain and ore etc., - Banana
carriers – Coal Carriers – Forest Products carriers – Timber carriers – Container
vessels.
UNIT II 9
Oil Tanker Cargo Operations: Pipeline systems – Ring main – Direct Line – Combined
– Free flow system – Stripping lines.
Lining up pipe lines and cargo operations – loading more than one grade – discharging –
ballasting – precautions – ship / shore check list safety goods – sources of ignition on
tankers – static electricity – precautions to prevent ignition due to static electricity cargo
operations when not secured alongside – procedure if oil spill occurs – oil record books.
UNIT III 9
Oil tankers routine operations: Inert Gas system – principle – components of system,
plant and distribution system – uses of inert gas during tanker operating cycle.
Tank washing: Procedure – portable and fixed machines – tank washing with water –
washing atmospheres – crude oil washing (COW) – advantages and disadvantages of
COW – operating and safety procedures – gas freeing – pressure vacuum values –
“Load on Top” system (LOT) regulations and operation – Segregated Ballast Tanks
(SBT).
UNIT IV 9
Intrinsically dangerous Cargos - Dangerous goods – loaded in bulk – packaging –
IMDG code – emergency procedures – ‘MS & M’ notices – general fire precautions,
during loading / discharging, - fire fighting and detection system. Liquefied gas cargoes
– regulations types of cargo and carriers – LPG and LNG – cargo handling equipments
tank monitors and controls – operational procedures loading and discharging of
LPG/LNG cargoes – chemical cargoes regulations, operations – bulk chemical carriers –
tank material and coatings – tank washing – cargo record book – equipment items
precautions to be observed during cargo operations in port – fire protection – personnel
protection.
35
UNIT V 9
Rules and Regulations - classification societies for hull, equipment and machineries of
Cargo ships and oil tankers – requirements of various types of surveys and certification
of Merchant Ships.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Lavery, “Ship board operation”, 2nd Edition, Butter Worth- Heinemann, London, 1990.
2. V.K. Bhandarkar, “MS & M Notices to Mariners”, 1st Edition, Bhandarkar Publications,
Mumbai, 1998.
3. D.J. Eyres, “Ship Construction”, 4th Edition, Butter worth – Heinemann, Oxford, 1994.
REFERENCES:
1. Indian Register of Shipping Part1 to Part7, ”Rules and Regulations for the
construction and classification of steel ships”, 1st Edition, Indian Register of Shipping,
Mumbai, 1999.
2. International of Maritime Organisation, “SOLAS consolidated Edition 1997”, 2nd
Edition, Sterling Book House, Mumbai, 1997.
MV2029 MARINE SYSTEMS MODELLING AND SIMULATION L T P C
3 0 0 3
AIM:
To impart knowledge on the Modelling of Marine Systems
OBJECTIVES
On completion of the course the students are expected to have the knowledge on the
 Modelling Approach
 Mathematical Models
 Simulation of discrete systems
 Simulation and Modelling of important sector viz. transport, shipping economics
UNIT I 9
System - Components – continuous and discrete systems – model of a system –
modelling approaches.
UNIT II 9
Testing Methods - Mid square method – the midproduct method – constant multiplier
method – additive congruential method – linear congruential method – test for random
numbers – the chi-square test – the kolmograv – Smirnov test – runs test – Gap test.
UNIT III 9
Statistical Techniques - Inverse transform technique – exponential distribution –
Poisson distribution – uniform distribution – waybill distribution – empirical distribution –
normal distribution – building an empirical distribution – the rejection method.
UNIT IV 9
Simulation– simulation of an event occurrence using random number table – simulation
of component failures using exponential and waybill models – simulation of a single
server queue and a two server queue – simulation of an inventory system.
36
UNIT V 9
Simulation & Modelling Applications - Transportation and logistics, shipping
economics, human resource – Simulation languages
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Narasingh Deo, System Simulation with digital computers, PHI, 1979.
2. Dr. P. Misra, Simulation and Modelling.
REFERENCES:
1. Gottfried, B.S., Elements of stochastic process simulation, Prentice Hall, London,
1984.
2. Barnhs, J., and Carson, J.S., Discrete-event system simulation, Prentice Hall,
London, 1984.
Previous
Next Post »